Nervousness - Fear Breastfeeding
Most health expert recommend six month of exclusive breastfeeding but statics suggest that numbers are not good, almost 95% mothers start breastfeeding but this number drops to 40% in first three month and further it drops to 15% till fifth month. Sometime its due to need of medication usage. Because of these statics its important to provide good information on safety of drugs in breastfeeding so that it can be improved when possible. In this FAQ sheet we will discuss about exposure to Nervousness - Fear while breastfeeding. We will also discuss about common side effects and warnings associated with Nervousness - Fear.

What is Nervousness - Fear used for?


SECTION Nervousness - Fear Formulated for associated symptoms such as aggression, hypersensitivity, tremors, nervous habits and loss of appetite.

Purpose: OTC - PURPOSE SECTION Formulated for associated symptoms such as aggression, hypersensitivity, tremors, nervous habits and loss of appetite.

Is Nervousness - Fear usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Nervousness - Fear safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Nervousness - Fear. There is no credible study done on safety of Nervousness - Fear while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Nervousness - Fear as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Nervousness - Fear Breastfeeding Analsys


Silver nitrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7761-88-8

Avoid using it on the breast or cleanse thoroughly before nursing.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Arabica coffee bean while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84650-00-0

Is Nervousness - Fear safe while breastfeeding

Infant intake after usual daily consumption of the mother is lower than usual recommended dose for neonatal apnea treatment. Elimination-time period may last from few hours in adults, to 3-4 days in the newborn infant. At higher dose (more than 300 mg per day) caffeine may induce irritability, tremor and insomnia in the infant. However, some infants may develop irritability at a lower dose; in those cases the mother should decide appropriate coffee intake. Some studies have failed to show harmful effect among infants whose mothers were strong coffee consumers even during pregnancy. Daily intake as high as 1 liter or more has been associated to anemia and iron deficiency in mothers and breastfed infants. Also, has been related to the Raynaud's phenomenon in the nipple of nursing women. Mean Caffeine content: 1 coffee cup: 100 mg, 1 black tea cup: 80 mg, 1 green tea cup: 50 mg, 1 liter of cola & soda and energizers beverages 100 to 340 mg. See also Caffeine as medication. The American Academy of Pediatrics rates it compatible with breastfeeding.

Hypericum perforatum while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68917-49-7

Herb commonly used from ancient times. Firm evidence is available on its effectiveness for treatment of depression, to the extent that it should be avoided a sudden stop of medication to prevent a rebound effect. It has been also topically used for the treatment of wounds, burns and eczema due to healing and antiseptical properties. Constituents are: Hypericin, Hyperforin and Quercetin. Antidepressant properties are attributed to Hypericin but mostly to Hyperforin. Quercetin is a flavonoid which is commonly found in many fruits and eatable vegetables. Hyperforin is excreted into breast milk in nil or clinically non-significant amount with not side-effects reported among breastfed infants from treated mothers, except for isolated and dubious cases of somnolence and colicky pain with spontaneous resolution with no medical intervention being required. Plasma levels in those infants were undetectable or close to the lower detectable point (0.1μg/L). Hypericin has not been detected in the breast milk. Quercetin levels found were as low as of few nanomols/L., and related to composition of fruits and vegetables of diet. It is most important to make sure that composition and amount of Hypericum contained in commercially available products is correct, do not take it without medical surveillance, avoid sudden stop and consider pharmacological interactions with many other medications.

Strychnos ignatii seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Iodine while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 7553-56-2

Disinfectant that contains high amount (2-7%) of Iodine in solution with alcohol or water (Lugol's solution) Not absorbed through intact skin of adults. However, it may trespass the inflamed skin, wounds, mucosa surfaces like vagina, in which case can reach concentration in grams in the human serum (1 g = 1,000 milligrams = 1,000,000 micrograms). Normal daily allowance is considered to be as high as 100 to 150 micrograms that increases to 200 – 300 micrograms in pregnancy or nursing period. The latter means less than one third of a milligram. Iodine is concentrated into breast milk with a level that could reach 20 times higher than the concentration in the blood. It has been found higher levels of Iodine, altered results of neonatal screening test for thyroid function, and, transient hypothyroidism in infants whose mothers were exposed to Iodine Povidone. Use should be avoid in the Delivery Room, Operating Room (C-section), Neonatal Units, Toddler admision areas and during the breastfeeding period. Sporadic or inadvertent use, specially on normal skin, does not require special test or procedures because it does not pose higher risk to the child.

Potassium bromide while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7447-40-7

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Magnesium phosphate, dibasic trihydrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7757-87-1

Ingested magnesium is not concentrated in the breast milk. Average natural concentration of magnesium in the milk is 31 mg / L (15 to 64 mg / L) which is barely affected by magnesium intake. Its low oral bioavailability makes the step to plasma infant from ingested breast milk is scarce, except in premature and immediate neonatal period that may be characterized by an increased intestinal absorption. Daily Magnesium needs for nursing mothers are estimated at 250 mg.Avoid chronic use or overuse.

Sodium chloride while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7647-14-5

Sodium chloride either as cooking salt, or, as oral rehydration solution, or, as IV fluid, is entirely compatible with BF.

Strychnos nux-vomica seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Sambucus nigra flowering top while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 977002-47-3

Bush. Bark, leaves, roots, flowers and fruits are used for medicinal purposes in traditional medicine (diuretic, laxative, anti-infective for cold relief ...) without any scientific evidence on effectiveness.It contains flavonoids (quercetin, isoquercitin and rutin), phenolic acids, terpenes, minerals, tannins. Quercetin is excreted in breast milk in a concentration which increases with diets that contain products like elderberry. In the elderberry as well as other plants are contained endocrine disruptors that could display pro or counter-estrogen activity. Since it has no proven therapeutic benefit, it seems wise to avoid any consumption or doing it in very moderate way during lactation.

Zinc while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 520-36-5

It is a widely used plant even in infants. Because of lack of toxicity, a moderate use is considered to be safe. If topically used, do not apply it on the nipple because risk of contact dermatitis has been reported. There are two different species with similar properties: 1) Common or Sweet Chamomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita). 2) Roman, English or Bitter Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis o Chamaemelum nobile). Inflorescence of the herb is used. Contains Essential Oil, Flavonoids, Lactones and Tannins. Unproven properties are: Anti-spasmodic. Digestive, Anti-inflammatory, Sedative.

Passiflora incarnata flowering top while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 8057-62-3

At latest update, relevant information on excretion into breast milk was not found. Aerial summits of this climbing plant are used. Constituents are: flavonoids, pyranics, heterosides, alkaloids. Attributed effects with only weak scientific evidence on effectiveness are: sedative, hypnotic, anti-spasmodic. Because of paucity of data on toxicity, recommendations done are to use it at low doses for short term periods. The European Medicines Agency does not authorize its use for children younger than 12 years old , pregnancy and breastfeeding. When used while breastfeeding, it is recommended to use it at low dose for a short-term period. Following-up the infant for sedation is recommended.

Valerian while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 8057-49-6

At last update significant data on breastfeeding were not found. A commonly used herb in many cultures and countries, even during pregnancy and breastfeeding with very few reported side-effects. Whenever not abused it has a low toxicity. Moderate use is considered to be compatible with breastfeeding, however because of the possibility of sedative effect in infants should better be avoided in cases of prematurity and in the neonatal period. Be aware of sedative effects in the infant. Roots, rhizomes and stolons of the plant are used. It contains iridoids, valepotriates, steroids, essential oils, GABA and tannins. Unproven beneficial effects in adults: sedative, hypnotic, anti-spasmodic. Indication after Commission E of German Ministry of Health: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety. Maximal daily dose: 9 g (2 g of dried extract)


Nervousness - Fear Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Iodine while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7553-56-2

Iodine is an essential trace nutrient for all infants that a normal component of breastmilk. Infant requirements are estimated to be 15 mcg/kg daily in fullterm infants and 30 mcg/kg daily in premature infants.[1] Systematic reviews and studies on iodine nutrition found that iodine in breastmilk is adequate in iodine-sufficient countries, but in countries with iodine fortification of foods, many mothers did not obtain adequate iodine and that additional supplementation was desirable.[2][3][4][5] In iodine-deficient areas, supplementation of breastfeeding mothers with iodine appears to be more effective than direct supplementation of the infant in reducing infant iodine deficiency.[6] The American Thyroid Association recommends that breastfeeding women should supplement their diet with a daily oral supplement that contains 150 mcg of iodine, but sustained iodine intake while breastfeeding that exceeds 500 to 1100 mcg daily should be avoided.[7] A survey in the United States between 2011 and 2014 found that only 19% of lactating women used a dietary supplement that contained iodine.[8] The use of excessive amounts of iodine in the mother near term and during breastfeeding (e.g., seaweed soup) can increase breastmilk iodine levels and cause transient hypothyroidism in breastfed infants. The absorption of iodine can be marked after application to open wounds or mucous membranes. Exposure of mothers to unnecessary iodine who are or will be breastfeeding should be avoided or minimized to the extent possible by avoiding its use on maternal mucous membranes (e.g., vaginal use, wound therapy), avoiding prolonged contact time, avoiding repeated applications, and applying it to the smallest possible surface areas of the body. It is possible that maternal exposure to iodine near term could interfere with thyroid studies done as a part of newborn screening tests.

Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8002-66-2

Two different plant species with similar effects are known as chamomile: German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Both contain similar ingredients, including sesquiterpenes (e.g., bisabolol, farnesene), sesquiterpenelactones (e.g., chamazulene, matricin), flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin), and volatile oils. Chamomile is used orally as a sedative and for gastrointestinal conditions; it is used topically for wound healing. Both herbal and homeopathic preparations have been used to treat mastitis and cracked, bleeding nipples.[1] Chamomile has been used as a galactogogue;[2][3] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] Chamomile is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) for use in food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a spice, seasoning, or flavoring agent. No data exist on the safety of chamomile in nursing mothers or infants, although rare sensitization may occur (see below).[5] It has been safely and effectively used alone and with other herbs in infants for the treatment of colic, diarrhea, and other conditions,[6][7][8][9] so the smaller amounts expected (but not demonstrated) in breastmilk are likely not to be harmful with usual maternal doses. Note Clostridium botulinum (botulism) spores have been found in some loose-leaf chamomile teas sold in health food stores. Topical chamomile is a known sensitizing agent, even with homeopathic products.[10] Two women developed contact dermatitis of the nipples and areolas after applying Kamillosan ointment for cracked nipples. The product was purchased in England and contained 10.5% Roman chamomile extracts and oil. Reactions were confirmed to be caused by Roman chamomile by patch testing in both women. Drinking chamomile tea can exacerbate topical skin rashes and has caused anaphylaxis in sensitized individuals.[11] Chamomile has possible cross-reactivity with other members of the aster family (e.g., echinacea, feverfew, and milk thistle).[5] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Valerian while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8008-88-6; 8057-49-6

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) root contains mono- and sesquiterpenes, and iridoid triesters (valepotriates). Preparations are sometimes standardized on valerenic acid content. Valerian has no specific uses in nursing mothers, but is most commonly used to treat anxiety and sleep disturbances, and occasionally for self-treatment of postpartum blues or depression.[1][2] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of valerian in nursing mothers or infants. In general, valerian is well tolerated, with side effects such as dizziness, hangover or headache reported occasionally. Valerian is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) for use in food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Valerian is often not recommended during lactation because of the theoretical concerns over its valepotriates and baldrinals which have been shown to be cytotoxic and mutagenic in vitro. Because there is no published experience with valerian during breastfeeding, an alternate therapy may be preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.


Nervousness - Fear Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Gelsemium sempervirens root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

All parts of the false jasmine usually contain toxic alkaloids. Eating just one flower has reportedly been lethal to children. The plant can also cause skin allergies in some people and it is possible that the plant toxins can be absorbed through the skin, especially if there are cuts. Its not recommended to use false jasmine while breastfeeding. It is acceptable in homeopathic preparation.


Sepia officinalis juice and Breastfeeding

Safe

SEPIA OFFICINALIS is usually low in mercury and its likely safe in breastfeeding.



What should I do if already breastfed my kid after using Nervousness - Fear?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Nervousness - Fear is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Nervousness - Fear, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Nervousness - Fear has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Nervousness - Fear, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Nervousness - Fear in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week