Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx Breastfeeding
It is a well known fact that breastfeeding is best source of nutrition for infants. Breast milk provides minerals, vitamins and antibodies in most acceptable format when they need it. Nutrition taken by mother passes to breast-milk and same thing applies to medicines taken by mothers. Not all drugs cause problem for baby but some do. Lets analyze if Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx is safe for baby while breastfed.

What is Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx used for?


to temporarily relieve pain symptoms associated with arthritis and/or joint pain or injuries including: stiffness swelling inflammation minor pain discomfort Indications based on the Homeopathic Materia Medica for self-limiting conditions.

Purpose: (Per Dose) Actaea, Causticum, Phos, Zinc met HPUS.........................................................Weakness Aesculus hipp, Bellis, Hamamelis HPUS.......................Soreness Arnica, Cimicifuga, Phytolacca HPUS...............................Aches Bryonia, Calc carb HPUS...............................................Swelling Calc fluor, Formicum acidum, Hypericum, Pulsatilla, Rhododendron, Salicylicum ac HPUS.........................................................Pain Lithium carb, Sulphur HPUS.........................................Stiffness Mag phos HPUS...........................................................Spasms Rhus tox HPUS.......................................................Tenderness Ruta, Sepia HPUS.....................................................Lameness

What are the risk associated with Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx usage while breastfeeding? What precautions shall I take while using it in breastfeeding?

Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx. There is no credible study done on safety of Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx Breastfeeding Analsys


Zinc while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Horse chestnut while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 8053-39-2

The seeds, bark and leaves are used. It contains Aescin and esculin (see specific info), with a vasoprotector effect and devoid of toxicity at normal doses. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk was found. Side effects are rare and mild.The Commission E of German Ministry of Health does not contraindicate the use of seed extract during infancy. Given its lack of toxicity at normal doses, a moderate consumption during lactation would pose a very low risk. For topical preparations, do not apply it on the chest or thoroughly clean it up before breastfeeding. See below the information of these related products:

Hamamelis virginiana root bark/stem bark while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68916-39-2

Leaves of the plant and sometimes bark also are used. It contains tannins, pro anthocyanidins and flavonic heterosides (quercitrin, isoquercitrin). Venous-tonic and anti-inflammatory properties have not been well established. The Commission E of the German Ministry of Health authorizes its use locally and by suppositories.

Arnica montana while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 977000-27-3

Se utilizan las flores y también raíces y hojas de esta planta herbácea.Contiene lactonas sesquiterpénicas, aceite esencial, flavonoides y trazas de alcaloides pirrolizidínicos.Uso tópico sobre piel íntegra.Indicaciones en medicina tradicional sin pruebas de su eficacia: antiinflamatorio tópico en contusiones, esguinces y dolores musculares localizados (EMA 2014). No aplicar sobre piel dañada.Es muy tóxica por vía oral (Anderson 2017) habiéndose descrito gastroenteritis, arritmia cardiaca problemas neurológicos y muerte (WHO 2007 p.77, n.a.l. 2001) en personas que la tomaron y un caso de anemia hemolitica grave en un recién nacido de 9 días cuya madre tomaba infusión de arnica (Miller 2009). A fecha de última actualización no encontramos datos publicados sobre su excreción en leche materna. La pequeña dosis y la escasa absorción plasmática de la mayoría de preparaciones dermatológicas tópicas  hacen poco probable el paso de cantidad significativa a leche materna. No aplicar sobre el pecho para que el lactante no lo ingiera, ni en áreas extensas o por periodos prolongados para evitar absorción sistémica. Conviene lavarse las manos después de la aplicación de arnica para evitar un posible contacto con la boca del lactante.

Black cohosh while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Rizomes and roots are used. It contains saponids, phytoestrogens, and other substances. Attributed effect: estrogenic stimulation. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: pre-menstrual dysmenorrhea, menopause. Maximal daily dose: 40 mg of drug equivalent. Do not use it for longer than 6 months Estrogen-agonist may decrease breast milk production and alter its composition.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Oyster shell calcium carbonate, crude while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 471-34-1

Various calcium salts (Acetate, Carbonate, Chloride, Citrate, Phosphate, Gluceptate, Glucobionato, Lactate, Laxctobionato Pidolate, Silicate) are used in the management of hypocalcemia, supplements for treating calcium deficiency states and antacids ( Carbonate and Silicate) Daily requirement of calcium during lactation are 1 g (1.3 g in children under 20 years).Calcium supplements in the diet does not affect the concentration of calcium in milk.Excessive intake of calcium is not good for health. During lactation, consumption of calcium should not exceed 2.5 g a day. WHO List of Essential Medicines 2002 states that it is compatible with breastfeeding.

Hypericum perforatum while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68917-49-7

Herb commonly used from ancient times. Firm evidence is available on its effectiveness for treatment of depression, to the extent that it should be avoided a sudden stop of medication to prevent a rebound effect. It has been also topically used for the treatment of wounds, burns and eczema due to healing and antiseptical properties. Constituents are: Hypericin, Hyperforin and Quercetin. Antidepressant properties are attributed to Hypericin but mostly to Hyperforin. Quercetin is a flavonoid which is commonly found in many fruits and eatable vegetables. Hyperforin is excreted into breast milk in nil or clinically non-significant amount with not side-effects reported among breastfed infants from treated mothers, except for isolated and dubious cases of somnolence and colicky pain with spontaneous resolution with no medical intervention being required. Plasma levels in those infants were undetectable or close to the lower detectable point (0.1μg/L). Hypericin has not been detected in the breast milk. Quercetin levels found were as low as of few nanomols/L., and related to composition of fruits and vegetables of diet. It is most important to make sure that composition and amount of Hypericum contained in commercially available products is correct, do not take it without medical surveillance, avoid sudden stop and consider pharmacological interactions with many other medications.

Salicylic acid while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 69-72-7

It is topically used as a keratolytic, antiseptic, antifungal, dermatological and stomatological agent. At last update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found . Systemic absorption (distribution into the body) depends on the concentration of the product used and the duration of application. Absorption may reach 10 to 25% of the total amount applied on the skin. It is recommended not to use during lactation in large areas of skin or for prolonged periods. Available data on the elimination of Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin-ASA) in breast milk indicates it is clinically insignificant.No cases have been reported on Reye's syndrome by ASA through the breast milk which is considered very unlikely to occur with isolated and/or small doses used as antithrombotic treatments and anti-abortion measures, even less after application on the skin or topically in the mouth. Do not apply on the breast to prevent ingestion by the infant. If necessary, apply it after the feed and wipe it off thoroughly with water before the next feed.

Lithium carbonate while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 554-13-2

It is excreted into breast milk in amounts that may be clinically significant and can be as high as a half of that reached in mother’s plasma and up to one third of the therapeutic level in the infant. In infants and newborns (5 days), premature babies and dehydrated or infected infants, who may show reduced clearance mechanisms for lithium, there have been reports of clear signs of lithium toxicity caused by ingestion of breast milk: cyanosis, lethargy, hypotonia or slight increase in TSH. However, there are numerous cases of infants whose mothers were on lithium who did not show any clinical, growth or neurodevelopmental problem at the short or long term. Breastfeeding is less risky for healthy term infants whose mothers are treated with lithium when she or her family has capacity enough to monitor the occurrence of adverse effects, medical supervision and, whenever necessary, monitoring of lithium levels in the mother-infant dyad. Mothers should stop taking lithium 1 to 2 days before delivery or cesarean section in order to decrease plasma levels in the newborn. Lithium may be, or not, a cause of increased Prolactin and galactorrhea.

Magnesium phosphate, dibasic trihydrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7757-87-1

Ingested magnesium is not concentrated in the breast milk. Average natural concentration of magnesium in the milk is 31 mg / L (15 to 64 mg / L) which is barely affected by magnesium intake. Its low oral bioavailability makes the step to plasma infant from ingested breast milk is scarce, except in premature and immediate neonatal period that may be characterized by an increased intestinal absorption. Daily Magnesium needs for nursing mothers are estimated at 250 mg.Avoid chronic use or overuse.

Calcium fluoride while Breastfeeding

Safe

Various calcium salts (Acetate, Carbonate, Chloride, Citrate, Phosphate, Gluceptate, Glucobionato, Lactate, Laxctobionato Pidolate, Silicate) are used in the management of hypocalcemia, supplements for treating calcium deficiency states and antacids ( Carbonate and Silicate) Daily requirement of calcium during lactation are 1 g (1.3 g in children under 20 years).Calcium supplements in the diet does not affect the concentration of calcium in milk.Excessive intake of calcium is not good for health. During lactation, consumption of calcium should not exceed 2.5 g a day. WHO List of Essential Medicines 2002 states that it is compatible with breastfeeding.


Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Black cohosh while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84776-26-1

Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa, formerly Actaea racemosa) root was thought to have mild estrogenic activity based on its triterpene content, which is standardized based on 27-deoxyactein. However, recent studies have found no estrogenic activity.[1][2] It is primarily used for postmenopausal symptoms and has been used to promote labor.[3][4][5][6][7][8] Currently, it has no specific uses during breastfeeding, although historically it was supposedly used by native American women as a galactogogue.[9] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of black cohosh in nursing mothers or infants. In general, there is a low frequency of adverse reactions, but dizziness, nausea, headache, rash, vomiting, and rarely, hepatitis and allergic reactions have been reported.[3][10][11] Some sources recommend against its use during breastfeeding because of the lack of safety data and its potential estrogenic activity,[10] while others do not contraindicate its use.[9] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Pulsatilla vulgaris while Breastfeeding



Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla and other related species) contains ranunculin, protoanemonin, and anemonin as well as triterpene saponins and flavonoids. The fresh plant is extremely irritating to the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous membranes. Allergic reactions have been reported to pulsatilla. Homeopathic preparations of pulsatilla are reportedly used for sore nipples and mastitis,[1] to reduce an overabundant milk supply,[2] or to increase milk supply.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No scientifically valid clinical trials support either of these uses. Because of a lack of information, other agents may be preferred in nursing mothers. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed

Salicylic acid while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 69-72-7

No information is available on the clinical use of salicylic acid on the skin during breastfeeding. Because it is unlikely to be appreciably absorbed or appear in breastmilk, it is considered safe to use during breastfeeding.[1] Avoid application to areas of the body that might come in direct contact with the infant's skin or where the drug might be ingested by the infant via licking.

Lithium carbonate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 554-13-2

Although lithium appears on many lists of drugs contraindicated during breastfeeding, other sources do not consider it an absolute contraindication, especially in infants over 2 months of age and during lithium monotherapy.[1][2][3][4] Numerous reports exist of infants who were breastfed during maternal lithium therapy without any signs of toxicity or developmental problems. Most were breastfed from birth and some continued to nurse for up to 1 year of maternal lithium therapy. Limited data suggest that lithium in milk can adversely affect the infant when its elimination is impaired, as in dehydration or in newborn or premature infants. Neonates may also have transplacentally acquired serum lithium levels. Because maternal lithium requirements and dosage may be increased during pregnancy, maternal serum levels should be monitored frequently postpartum and dosage reduced as necessary to avoid excessive infant exposure via breastmilk.[5] The long-term effects of lithium on infants are not certain, but limited data indicate no obvious problems in growth and development.[6] Lithium may be used in mothers of fullterm infants who are willing and able to monitor their infants. Discontinuing lithium 24 to 48 hours before Cesarean section delivery or at the onset of spontaneous labor and resuming the prepregnancy lithium dose immediately after delivery should minimize the infant's serum lithium concentration at birth.[7] Some investigators recommend monitoring infant serum lithium, serum creatinine, BUN, and TSH in intervals ranging from "periodic" to every 4 to 12 weeks during breastfeeding and maternal lithium therapy.[3][8][9] However, others recommend close pediatric follow-up of the infant and only selective laboratory monitoring as clinically indicated.[7] Breastfeeding should be discontinued immediately and the infant evaluated if the infant appears restless or lethargic or has feeding problems.[7]

Sulfur while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7704-34-9

Sulfur 5% to 10% in a petrolatum base is safe for topical use in children, including infants under 2 months of age.[1] This makes it a useful alternative to organic insecticides for treating scabies in nursing mothers; however, the petrolatum base makes undesirable for use on the breast.


Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Pulsatilla vulgaris and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Note: Mostly safe in Homeopathic preparations


Sulfur and Breastfeeding

Safe

Note: Study and data for tropical use only

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.

Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.


Sepia officinalis juice and Breastfeeding

Safe

SEPIA OFFICINALIS is usually low in mercury and its likely safe in breastfeeding.


Calcium fluoride and Breastfeeding

Safe

Natural version of fluoride is called calcium fluoride and is usually found in soil. With any sort of spring or natural source of water there will always be trace amounts of calcium fluoride. Of course, like anything else consumed in extreme excess, this type of fluoride does have the potential to cause health problems.



What should I do if already breastfed my kid after using Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Promaxol | Ionx Holdings D/b/a Vetionx in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week