Trauma Remedy Breastfeeding

Most health expert recommend six month of exclusive breastfeeding but statics suggest that numbers are not good, almost 95% mothers start breastfeeding but this number drops to 40% in first three month and further it drops to 15% till fifth month. Sometime its due to need of medication usage. Because of these statics its important to provide good information on safety of drugs in breastfeeding so that it can be improved when possible. In this FAQ sheet we will discuss about exposure to Trauma Remedy while breastfeeding. We will also discuss about common side effects and warnings associated with Trauma Remedy.

What is Trauma Remedy used for?


For temporary relief of symptoms related to minor injuries including bruises, contusions, lesions, sprains, and trauma following surgery.** **These statements are based upon traditional homeopathic principles. They have not been reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Is Trauma Remedy usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Trauma Remedy safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Trauma Remedy. There is no credible study done on safety of Trauma Remedy while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Trauma Remedy as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Trauma Remedy Breastfeeding Analsys


Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 520-36-5

It is a widely used plant even in infants. Because of lack of toxicity, a moderate use is considered to be safe. If topically used, do not apply it on the nipple because risk of contact dermatitis has been reported. There are two different species with similar properties: 1) Common or Sweet Chamomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita). 2) Roman, English or Bitter Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis o Chamaemelum nobile). Inflorescence of the herb is used. Contains Essential Oil, Flavonoids, Lactones and Tannins. Unproven properties are: Anti-spasmodic. Digestive, Anti-inflammatory, Sedative.

Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)

Hamamelis virginiana root bark/stem bark while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68916-39-2

Leaves of the plant and sometimes bark also are used. It contains tannins, pro anthocyanidins and flavonic heterosides (quercitrin, isoquercitrin). Venous-tonic and anti-inflammatory properties have not been well established. The Commission E of the German Ministry of Health authorizes its use locally and by suppositories.

Hypericum perforatum while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68917-49-7

Herb commonly used from ancient times. Firm evidence is available on its effectiveness for treatment of depression, to the extent that it should be avoided a sudden stop of medication to prevent a rebound effect. It has been also topically used for the treatment of wounds, burns and eczema due to healing and antiseptical properties. Constituents are: Hypericin, Hyperforin and Quercetin. Antidepressant properties are attributed to Hypericin but mostly to Hyperforin. Quercetin is a flavonoid which is commonly found in many fruits and eatable vegetables. Hyperforin is excreted into breast milk in nil or clinically non-significant amount with not side-effects reported among breastfed infants from treated mothers, except for isolated and dubious cases of somnolence and colicky pain with spontaneous resolution with no medical intervention being required. Plasma levels in those infants were undetectable or close to the lower detectable point (0.1μg/L). Hypericin has not been detected in the breast milk. Quercetin levels found were as low as of few nanomols/L., and related to composition of fruits and vegetables of diet. It is most important to make sure that composition and amount of Hypericum contained in commercially available products is correct, do not take it without medical surveillance, avoid sudden stop and consider pharmacological interactions with many other medications.

Calendula officinalis flowering top while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 977001-93-6

The inflorescences of this plant originating in Europe are used.It contains polysaccharides, flavonoids, saponins… Attributed properties which do not have sufficient clinical evidence to support them: healing agent, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory (local, dermatological). There is no evidence of its efficacy when taken orally to treat gastrointestinal disorders. Indications from the Commission E of the German Ministry of Health and the EMA: topical treatment of minor skin inflammations, ulcers and burns. Since the last update we have not found any published data on its excretion in breast milk. A plant devoid of toxicity. Oral use during breastfeeding is not advised (EMA 2008, Amir 2011).The small dose and poor plasma uptake of most topical dermatological preparations make it very unlikely that significant amounts will pass into breast milk. There is no evidence of its effectiveness in treating nipple cracking or inflammation. If applied to the breast, do so after breastfeeding and clean before the next feed.

Arnica montana while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 977000-27-3

Se utilizan las flores y también raíces y hojas de esta planta herbácea.Contiene lactonas sesquiterpénicas, aceite esencial, flavonoides y trazas de alcaloides pirrolizidínicos.Uso tópico sobre piel íntegra.Indicaciones en medicina tradicional sin pruebas de su eficacia: antiinflamatorio tópico en contusiones, esguinces y dolores musculares localizados (EMA 2014). No aplicar sobre piel dañada.Es muy tóxica por vía oral (Anderson 2017) habiéndose descrito gastroenteritis, arritmia cardiaca problemas neurológicos y muerte (WHO 2007 p.77, n.a.l. 2001) en personas que la tomaron y un caso de anemia hemolitica grave en un recién nacido de 9 días cuya madre tomaba infusión de arnica (Miller 2009). A fecha de última actualización no encontramos datos publicados sobre su excreción en leche materna. La pequeña dosis y la escasa absorción plasmática de la mayoría de preparaciones dermatológicas tópicas  hacen poco probable el paso de cantidad significativa a leche materna. No aplicar sobre el pecho para que el lactante no lo ingiera, ni en áreas extensas o por periodos prolongados para evitar absorción sistémica. Conviene lavarse las manos después de la aplicación de arnica para evitar un posible contacto con la boca del lactante.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Calcium sulfide while Breastfeeding

Safe

Various calcium salts (Acetate, Carbonate, Chloride, Citrate, Phosphate, Gluceptate, Glucobionato, Lactate, Laxctobionato Pidolate, Silicate) are used in the management of hypocalcemia, supplements for treating calcium deficiency states and antacids ( Carbonate and Silicate) Daily requirement of calcium during lactation are 1 g (1.3 g in children under 20 years).Calcium supplements in the diet does not affect the concentration of calcium in milk.Excessive intake of calcium is not good for health. During lactation, consumption of calcium should not exceed 2.5 g a day. WHO List of Essential Medicines 2002 states that it is compatible with breastfeeding.

Activated charcoal while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7440-44-0

Powdered carbon with high adsorption levels.Administrated orally, it adsorbs drugs and toxins, avoiding their absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. It also has uses as an antidiarrheal and antiflatulent and for marking breast lesions in mammography. Since the last update we have not found published data about its excretion in breast milk. Its zero intestinal absorption (Torbet 2005, AEMPS 1998) prevents its passing into plasma and therefore into breast milk. It use is permitted in infants under one year old (Pediamecum 2015).


Trauma Remedy Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8002-66-2

Two different plant species with similar effects are known as chamomile: German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Both contain similar ingredients, including sesquiterpenes (e.g., bisabolol, farnesene), sesquiterpenelactones (e.g., chamazulene, matricin), flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin), and volatile oils. Chamomile is used orally as a sedative and for gastrointestinal conditions; it is used topically for wound healing. Both herbal and homeopathic preparations have been used to treat mastitis and cracked, bleeding nipples.[1] Chamomile has been used as a galactogogue;[2][3] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] Chamomile is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) for use in food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a spice, seasoning, or flavoring agent. No data exist on the safety of chamomile in nursing mothers or infants, although rare sensitization may occur (see below).[5] It has been safely and effectively used alone and with other herbs in infants for the treatment of colic, diarrhea, and other conditions,[6][7][8][9] so the smaller amounts expected (but not demonstrated) in breastmilk are likely not to be harmful with usual maternal doses. Note Clostridium botulinum (botulism) spores have been found in some loose-leaf chamomile teas sold in health food stores. Topical chamomile is a known sensitizing agent, even with homeopathic products.[10] Two women developed contact dermatitis of the nipples and areolas after applying Kamillosan ointment for cracked nipples. The product was purchased in England and contained 10.5% Roman chamomile extracts and oil. Reactions were confirmed to be caused by Roman chamomile by patch testing in both women. Drinking chamomile tea can exacerbate topical skin rashes and has caused anaphylaxis in sensitized individuals.[11] Chamomile has possible cross-reactivity with other members of the aster family (e.g., echinacea, feverfew, and milk thistle).[5] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84696-11-7; 90028-20

Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida) contain high molecular weight polysaccharides (e.g., heteroxylan, arabinogalactan) and lower molecular weight compounds (e.g., alkylamides, caffeoyl conjugates such as cichoric acid and echinacosides), but no single chemical is known to be responsible for echinacea's biological activity. Some products have been standardized based on echinacoside, and others on cichoric acid. Echinacea has no specific uses during breastfeeding, but is commonly used orally to treat or prevent upper respiratory infections. It is also used topically to treat skin infections. Excretion of some of the purportedly active alkamides was found in breastmilk in one mother. No data exist on the safety and efficacy of echinacea in nursing mothers or infants. In general, echinacea is well tolerated with gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and constipation, skin rash and rarely allergic reactions reported. It may also alter the metabolism of some dugs metabolized by the P450 enzyme system. Some sources indicate that echinacea is safe in recommended doses,[1] while others recommend avoiding it during breastfeeding because of the lack of published safety data. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Calendula officinalis flowering top while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84776-23-8; 70892-20

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) flowers contain triterpene glycosides and aglycones, carotenoids, and essential oils. Topical application of calendula products has been used to treat sore and cracked nipples during nursing, either in homeopathic or pharmacologic preparations,[1][2][3] although little high-quality evidence supports this use.[4] One uncontrolled case series found that a cream containing Mimosa tenuiflora and Calendula officinalis was useful for healing cracked nipples during breastfeeding;[5] however, the lack of a control group and the presence of another ingredient makes the evaluation of calendula's efficacy impossible. Oral calendula has no specific lactation-related uses and no information is available on the oral use of calendula during breastfeeding. Calendula is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration when used as a seasoning or flavoring. Allergic reactions, including cross-reactions to chrysanthemums, daisies and marigolds, occur rarely. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.


Trauma Remedy Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.



What should I do if already breastfed my kid after using Trauma Remedy?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Trauma Remedy is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Trauma Remedy, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Trauma Remedy has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Trauma Remedy, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Trauma Remedy in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week