Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg Breastfeeding
For most of the drugs advantages of taking medications overweighs the potential risks however some drugs could be really dangerous for breastfed baby hence every medication shall be considered separately. In this page we will discuss about purpose of Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg and its risk associated with lactation. We will also discuss the usage of Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg and some common side effects associated with Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg.

What is Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg used for?


Major Depressive Disorder Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Adult The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 5- and 6-week trials with depressed adult and geriatric outpatients (≥18 years of age) whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III (currently DSM-IV) category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). A major depressive episode (DSM-IV) implies a prominent and relatively persistent (nearly every day for at least 2 weeks) depressed or dysphoric mood that usually interferes with daily functioning, and includes at least five of the following nine symptoms: depressed mood, loss of interest in usual activities, significant change in weight and/or appetite, insomnia or hypersomnia, psychomotor agitation or retardation, increased fatigue, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, slowed thinking or impaired concentration, a suicide attempt or suicidal ideation. The effects of fluoxetine in hospitalized depressed patients have not been adequately studied. The efficacy of fluoxetine 20 mg once daily in maintaining a response in major depressive disorder for up to 38 weeks following 12 weeks of open-label acute treatment (50 weeks total) was demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial. Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in two 8- to 9-week placebo-controlled clinical trials in depressed outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R or DSM-IV category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). The usefulness of the drug in adult and pediatric patients receiving fluoxetine for extended periods should be reevaluated periodically. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Adult Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of obsessions and compulsions in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder(OCD), as defined in the DSM-III-R; i.e., the obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, or significantly interfere with social or occupational functioning. The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 13-week trials with obsessive compulsive outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R category of OCD (see CLINICAL TRIALS). OCD is characterized by recurrent and persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses, or images (obsessions) that are ego-dystonic and/or repetitive, purposeful, and intentional behaviors (compulsions) that are recognized by the person as excessive or unreasonable. The effectiveness of fluoxetine in long-term use, i.e., for more than 13 weeks, has not been systematically evaluated in placebo-controlled trials. Therefore, the physician who elects to use fluoxetine for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in a 13-week, dose titration, clinical trial in patients with OCD, as defined in DSM-IV (see CLINICAL TRIALS). Bulimia Nervosa Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of binge-eating and vomiting behaviors in patients with moderate to severe bulimia nervosa. The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 8- to 16-week trials for adult outpatients with moderate to severe bulimia nervosa, i.e., at least three bulimic episodes per week for 6 months (see CLINICAL TRIALS). The efficacy of fluoxetine 60 mg/day in maintaining a response, in patients with bulimia who responded during an 8-week acute treatment phase while taking fluoxetine 60 mg/day and were then observed for relapse during a period of up to 52 weeks, was demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial (see CLINICAL TRIALS). Nevertheless, the physician who elects to use fluoxetine for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Panic Disorder Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, as defined in DSM-IV. Panic disorder is characterized by the occurrence of unexpected panic attacks, and associated concern about having additional attacks, worry about the implications or consequences of the attacks, and/or a significant change in behaviour related to the attacks. The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in two 12-week clinical trials in patients whose diagnoses corresponded to the DSM-IV category of panic disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). Panic disorder (DSM-IV) is characterized by recurrent, unexpected panic attacks, i.e., a discrete period of intense fear or discomfort in which four or more of the following symptoms develop abruptly and reach a peak within 10 minutes: 1) palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate; 2) sweating; 3) trembling or shaking; 4) sensations of shortness of breath or smothering; 5) feeling of choking; 6) chest pain or discomfort; 7) nausea or abdominal distress; 8) feeling dizzy, unsteady, lightheaded, or faint; 9) fear of losing control; 10) fear of dying; 11) paresthesias (numbness or tingling sensations); 12) chills or hot flashes. The effectiveness of fluoxetine in long-term use, i.e., for more than 12 weeks, has not been established in placebo-controlled trials. Therefore, the physician who elects to use fluoxetine for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
Major Depressive Disorder Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Adult The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 5- and 6-week trials with depressed adult and geriatric outpatients (≥18 years of age) whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III (currently DSM-IV) category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). A major depressive episode (DSM-IV) implies a prominent and relatively persistent (nearly every day for at least 2 weeks) depressed or dysphoric mood that usually interferes with daily functioning, and includes at least five of the following nine symptoms: depressed mood, loss of interest in usual activities, significant change in weight and/or appetite, insomnia or hypersomnia, psychomotor agitation or retardation, increased fatigue, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, slowed thinking or impaired concentration, a suicide attempt or suicidal ideation. The effects of fluoxetine in hospitalized depressed patients have not been adequately studied. The efficacy of fluoxetine 20 mg once daily in maintaining a response in major depressive disorder for up to 38 weeks following 12 weeks of open-label acute treatment (50 weeks total) was demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial. Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in two 8- to 9-week placebo-controlled clinical trials in depressed outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R or DSM-IV category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). The usefulness of the drug in adult and pediatric patients receiving fluoxetine for extended periods should be reevaluated periodically.
Adult The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 5- and 6-week trials with depressed adult and geriatric outpatients (≥18 years of age) whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III (currently DSM-IV) category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). A major depressive episode (DSM-IV) implies a prominent and relatively persistent (nearly every day for at least 2 weeks) depressed or dysphoric mood that usually interferes with daily functioning, and includes at least five of the following nine symptoms: depressed mood, loss of interest in usual activities, significant change in weight and/or appetite, insomnia or hypersomnia, psychomotor agitation or retardation, increased fatigue, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, slowed thinking or impaired concentration, a suicide attempt or suicidal ideation. The effects of fluoxetine in hospitalized depressed patients have not been adequately studied. The efficacy of fluoxetine 20 mg once daily in maintaining a response in major depressive disorder for up to 38 weeks following 12 weeks of open-label acute treatment (50 weeks total) was demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial.
Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in two 8- to 9-week placebo-controlled clinical trials in depressed outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R or DSM-IV category of major depressive disorder (see CLINICAL TRIALS). The usefulness of the drug in adult and pediatric patients receiving fluoxetine for extended periods should be reevaluated periodically.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Adult Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of obsessions and compulsions in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder(OCD), as defined in the DSM-III-R; i.e., the obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, or significantly interfere with social or occupational functioning. The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 13-week trials with obsessive compulsive outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R category of OCD (see CLINICAL TRIALS). OCD is characterized by recurrent and persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses, or images (obsessions) that are ego-dystonic and/or repetitive, purposeful, and intentional behaviors (compulsions) that are recognized by the person as excessive or unreasonable. The effectiveness of fluoxetine in long-term use, i.e., for more than 13 weeks, has not been systematically evaluated in placebo-controlled trials. Therefore, the physician who elects to use fluoxetine for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in a 13-week, dose titration, clinical trial in patients with OCD, as defined in DSM-IV (see CLINICAL TRIALS).
Adult Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of obsessions and compulsions in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder(OCD), as defined in the DSM-III-R; i.e., the obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, or significantly interfere with social or occupational functioning. The efficacy of fluoxetine was established in 13-week trials with obsessive compulsive outpatients whose diagnoses corresponded most closely to the DSM-III-R category of OCD (see CLINICAL TRIALS). OCD is characterized by recurrent and persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses, or images (obsessions) that are ego-dystonic and/or repetitive, purposeful, and intentional behaviors (compulsions) that are recognized by the person as excessive or unreasonable. The effectiveness of fluoxetine in long-term use, i.e., for more than 13 weeks, has not been systematically evaluated in placebo-controlled trials. Therefore, the physician who elects to use fluoxetine for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
Pediatric (children and adolescents) The efficacy of fluoxetine in children and adolescents was established in a 13-week, dose titration, clinical trial in patients with OCD, as defined in DSM-IV (see CLINICAL TRIALS).

I am breastfeeding mother and I am using Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg. Can it have any bad effect on my kid? Shall I search for better alternative?

Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg low risk for breastfeeding
Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg contains only one active ingredient that is Fluoxetine. We have analyzed the usage of Fluoxetine in breastfeeding and our analysis suggest that Fluoxetine poses Low risk for infant while breastfeeding and hence Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg itself shall be considered Low risk item for breastfeeding.

Statement of Manufacturer/Labeler about breastfeeding usage
Nursing mothers Because fluoxetine is excreted in human milk, nursing while on fluoxetine is not recommended. In one breast-milk sample, the concentration of fluoxetine plus norfluoxetine was 70.4 ng/mL. The concentration in the mother’s plasma was 295.0 ng/mL. No adverse effects on the infant were reported. In another case, an infant nursed by a mother on fluoxetine developed crying, sleep disturbance, vomiting, and watery stools. The infant’s plasma drug levels were 340 ng/mL of fluoxetine and 208 ng/mL of norfluoxetine on the second day of feeding.

Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys


Fluoxetine while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 54910-89-3

Higher excretion into breast milk than other related antidepressant drugs. The active metabolite called Norfluoxetine has a longer half-life (4 to 16 days). Like other antidepressant drugs may induce hyperprolactinemia and galactorrhea. Few cases of colicky pain, irritability, insomnia, anorexia and slow weight gain have been described. However, most reported cases have failed to show harm effect outside the newborn period. Large experience with the use of Fluoxatine did not find harm effect on weight gain and neurological development of infants either at short or long term. Most problems have appeared in the early neonatal period either in newborns or premature infants whose mothers were on Fluoxetine during pregnancy. Stop or switch to other medication either at some days before delivery or in the first month postpartum would be recommended. Same considerations should be done in case of prematurity, however, medication must be continued if necessary. Women on anti-depressant treatment are in need of stronger support because of higher risk of breastfeeding failure.


Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Fluoxetine while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 54910-89-3

Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg and breastfeeding

The average amount of drug in breastmilk is higher with fluoxetine than with most other SSRIs and the long-acting, active metabolite, norfluoxetine, is detectable in the serum of most breastfed infants during the first 2 months postpartum and in a few thereafter. Adverse effects such as colic, fussiness, and drowsiness have been reported in some breastfed infants. Decreased infant weight gain was found in one study, but not in others. No adverse effects on development have been found in a few infants followed for up to a year. If fluoxetine is required by the mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding. If the mother was taking fluoxetine during pregnancy or if other antidepressants have been ineffective, most experts recommend against changing medications during breastfeeding. Otherwise, agents with lower excretion into breastmilk may be preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant. The breastfed infant should be monitored for behavioral side effects such as colic, fussiness or sedation and for adequate weight gain. Mothers taking an SSRI during pregnancy and postpartum may have more difficulty breastfeeding, although this might be a reflection of their disease state.[1] These mothers may need additional breastfeeding support. Breastfed infants exposed to an SSRI during the third trimester of pregnancy have a lower risk of poor neonatal adaptation than formula-fed infants.


Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg safe for breastfeeding

What should I do if I am breastfeeding mother and I am already exposed to Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg?

Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg is in the category of low risk, if you have already used it then its not a big deal if health and behavior of baby is good. However your health care provider shall be aware of the fact that you have used Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg so you should inform him based on your convenience.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg, is it safe?

Though Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg dose not comes in category of safe drugs rather it comes in category of low risk but if your doctor is aware that you are breastfeeding your baby and has still recommended it then its advantages must be outweighing the risks.


If I am using Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not much monitoring required while using Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Fluoxetine Fluoxetine 1.0 Mg in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week