Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle Breastfeeding

Do you know that important immune protective proteins are present in breast milk? Breast milk also contains required vitamins, minerals, saturated and un saturated fats. These things are extremely important for development of healthy brain. If you are taking any medicine for short term or for the chronic reason then that passes in breast milk as well, that is why you should always check the drug with your health care provider. Here at DrLact we try to analyze drugs based on available researches and in this sheet we will present our analysis for Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle.

What is Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle used for?


Diazepam is a benzodiazepine that exerts anxiolytic, sedative, muscle-relaxant, anticonvulsant and amnestic effects. Most of these effects are thought to result from a facilitation of the action of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacokinetics Absorption After oral administration >90% of diazepam is absorbed and the average time to achieve peak plasma concentrations is 1 – 1.5 hours with a range of 0.25 to 2.5 hours. Absorption is delayed and decreased when administered with a moderate fat meal. In the presence of food mean lag times are approximately 45 minutes as compared with 15 minutes when fasting. There is also an increase in the average time to achieve peak concentrations to about 2.5 hours in the presence of food as compared with 1.25 hours when fasting. This results in an average decrease in Cmax of 20% in addition to a 27% decrease in AUC (range 15% to 50%) when administered with food. Distribution Diazepam and its metabolites are highly bound to plasma proteins (diazepam 98%). Diazepam and its metabolites cross the blood-brain and placental barriers and are also found in breast milk in concentrations approximately one tenth of those in maternal plasma (days 3 to 9 post-partum). In young healthy males, the volume of distribution at steady-state is 0.8 to 1.0 L/kg. The decline in the plasma concentration-time profile after oral administration is biphasic. The initial distribution phase has a half-life of approximately 1 hour, although it may range up to >3 hours. Metabolism Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and 2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyldiazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Temazepam and oxazepam are largely eliminated by glucuronidation. Elimination The initial distribution phase is followed by a prolonged terminal elimination phase (half-life up to 48 hours). The terminal elimination half-life of the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam is up to 100 hours. Diazepam and its metabolites are excreted mainly in the urine, predominantly as their glucuronide conjugates. The clearance of diazepam is 20 to 30 mL/min in young adults. Diazepam accumulates upon multiple dosing and there is some evidence that the terminal elimination half-life is slightly prolonged. Pharmacokinetics in Special Populations Children In children 3 - 8 years old the mean half-life of diazepam has been reported to be 18 hours. Newborns In full term infants, elimination half-lives around 30 hours have been reported, with a longer average half-life of 54 hours reported in premature infants of 28 - 34 weeks gestational age and 8 - 81 days post-partum. In both premature and full term infants the active metabolite desmethyldiazepam shows evidence of continued accumulation compared to children. Longer half-lives in infants may be due to incomplete maturation of metabolic pathways. Geriatric Elimination half-life increases by approximately 1 hour for each year of age beginning with a half-life of 20 hours at 20 years of age. This appears to be due to an increase in volume of distribution with age and a decrease in clearance. Consequently, the elderly may have lower peak concentrations, and on multiple dosing higher trough concentrations. It will also take longer to reach steady-state. Conflicting information has been published on changes of plasma protein binding in the elderly. Reported changes in free drug may be due to significant decreases in plasma proteins due to causes other than simply aging. Hepatic Insufficiency In mild and moderate cirrhosis, average half-life is increased. The average increase has been variously reported from 2-fold to 5-fold, with individual half-lives over 500 hours reported. There is also an increase in volume of distribution, and average clearance decreases by almost half. Mean half-life is also prolonged with hepatic fibrosis to 90 hours (range 66 - 104 hours), with chronic active hepatitis to 60 hours (range 26 - 76 hours), and with acute viral hepatitis to 74 hours (range 49 - 129). In chronic active hepatitis, clearance is decreased by almost half.

Is Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle low risk for breastfeeding
Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle contains only one active ingredient that is Diazepam. We have analyzed the usage of Diazepam in breastfeeding and our analysis suggest that Diazepam poses Low risk for infant while breastfeeding and hence Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle itself shall be considered Low risk item for breastfeeding.

Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle Breastfeeding Analsys


Diazepam while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 439-14-5

It is a long-acting Benzodiazepine. Low excreted into breast milk. However, it may cause sedation and poor suction reflex in the infant mostly because of large or repetitive use in the newborn period. Low dose and short-term use is usually compatible with breastfeeding. Choose a short-acting and minimal effective drug dose specially when nursing a newborn. Watch out for somnolence and poor feeding of the infant. Bed-sharing is not recommended for mothers who are taking this medication.


Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Diazepam while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 439-14-5

Diazepam is excreted into breastmilk and it and its active metabolite, nordiazepam, accumulate in the serum of breastfed infants with repeated doses. Because the half-life of diazepam and nordiazepam are long, timing breastfeeding with respect to the dose is of little or no benefit in reducing infant exposure. Other agents are preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant. After a single dose of diazepam, as for sedation before a procedure, there is usually no need to wait to resume breastfeeding, although with a newborn or preterm infant, a cautious approach would be to wait a period of 6 to 8 hours before resuming nursing.



I already used Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle and meanwhile I breastfed my baby should I be concerned?

Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle is in the category of low risk, if you have already used it then its not a big deal if health and behavior of baby is good. However your health care provider shall be aware of the fact that you have used Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle so you should inform him based on your convenience.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle, is it safe?

Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle comes in category of low risk and if your doctor is aware that you are breastfeeding it should be ok to use without much concerns.


If I am using Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not much monitoring required while using Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Diazepam 2 In 1 Bottle in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week