Colds And Flu Response Breastfeeding
Do you know that important immune protective proteins are present in breast milk? Breast milk also contains required vitamins, minerals, saturated and un saturated fats. These things are extremely important for development of healthy brain. If you are taking any medicine for short term or for the chronic reason then that passes in breast milk as well, that is why you should always check the drug with your health care provider. Here at DrLact we try to analyze drugs based on available researches and in this sheet we will present our analysis for Colds And Flu Response.

What is Colds And Flu Response used for?


For temporary relief of: •body aches & pains •nasal congestion •headaches & fevers associated with the common cold and flu. Use according to label indications under standard homeopathic indications.

Purpose: For temporary relief of: body aches & pains nasal congestion headaches & fevers associated with the common cold and flu

Is Colds And Flu Response usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Colds And Flu Response safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Colds And Flu Response. There is no credible study done on safety of Colds And Flu Response while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Colds And Flu Response as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Colds And Flu Response Breastfeeding Analsys


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Echinacea, unspecified while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)

Echinacea purpurea while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)

Potassium cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7447-40-7

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Zinc cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Zinc cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 3486-35-9

It is used topically as an astringent and skin protector, very often together with small amounts of Ferric Oxide to form Calamine (see specific info). It is a product compatible with breastfeeding according to WHO Essential Medicine’s List - 2002.It is also used in dental hygiene products and cosmetics. Because of the small dose used and poor absorption into plasma of most topical dermatological preparations, excretion into breastmilk in significant amount appears to be unlikely. Do not apply on the breast to prevent infant ingestion; otherwise, wash it off thoroughly with water before the next breast feed.

Zinc while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Zinc cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7646-85-7

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Zinc cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 1314-13-2

It is used topically as an astringent and skin protector, very often together with small amounts of Ferric Oxide to form Calamine (see specific info). It is a product compatible with breastfeeding according to WHO Essential Medicine’s List - 2002.It is also used in dental hygiene products and cosmetics. Widely used for skin protection of the diaper area in infants. Because of the small dose used and poor absorption into plasma of most topical dermatological preparations, excretion into breastmilk in significant amount appears to be unlikely. Do not apply on the breast to prevent infant ingestion; otherwise, wash it off thoroughly with water before the next breast feed.

Zinc picrate nonahydrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).

Zinc valerate dihydrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for nutrition. It is present in many foods.Recommended daily allowance of Zn is 8 to 15 mg. (Moran Hall 2010). Millions of people worldwide are Zn-deficient.It is used as a treatment for Wilson's disease and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Zn is involved in the regulation process of lactation (Lee 2016).Pasteurization of the milk does not affect the concentration of Zn and other trace elements (Mohd Taufek-2016). The average concentration of Zn in breastmilk is 4 to 16 mg / L (Picciano 1976, Hannan 2005, Dórea 2012) which is independent of plasma levels and maternal daily intake (Krebs 1995, Chierici 1999, Hannan 2009).Intestinal absorption of zinc is almost doubled during pregnancy and lactation (Fung 1997).Zinc levels in the infant are dependent on Zinc levels in the breast milk (Dumrongwongsiri 2015)With a varied and balanced diet, an extra intake of minerals is not needed. Excessive intake of Zinc may cause gastrointestinal problems and Pancytopenia (Irving 2003).


Colds And Flu Response Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]

Echinacea, unspecified while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84696-11-7; 90028-20

Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida) contain high molecular weight polysaccharides (e.g., heteroxylan, arabinogalactan) and lower molecular weight compounds (e.g., alkylamides, caffeoyl conjugates such as cichoric acid and echinacosides), but no single chemical is known to be responsible for echinacea's biological activity. Some products have been standardized based on echinacoside, and others on cichoric acid. Echinacea has no specific uses during breastfeeding, but is commonly used orally to treat or prevent upper respiratory infections. It is also used topically to treat skin infections. Excretion of some of the purportedly active alkamides was found in breastmilk in one mother. No data exist on the safety and efficacy of echinacea in nursing mothers or infants. In general, echinacea is well tolerated with gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and constipation, skin rash and rarely allergic reactions reported. It may also alter the metabolism of some dugs metabolized by the P450 enzyme system. Some sources indicate that echinacea is safe in recommended doses,[1] while others recommend avoiding it during breastfeeding because of the lack of published safety data. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Pulsatilla vulgaris while Breastfeeding



Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla and other related species) contains ranunculin, protoanemonin, and anemonin as well as triterpene saponins and flavonoids. The fresh plant is extremely irritating to the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous membranes. Allergic reactions have been reported to pulsatilla. Homeopathic preparations of pulsatilla are reportedly used for sore nipples and mastitis,[1] to reduce an overabundant milk supply,[2] or to increase milk supply.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No scientifically valid clinical trials support either of these uses. Because of a lack of information, other agents may be preferred in nursing mothers. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed

Sulfur while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7704-34-9

Sulfur 5% to 10% in a petrolatum base is safe for topical use in children, including infants under 2 months of age.[1] This makes it a useful alternative to organic insecticides for treating scabies in nursing mothers; however, the petrolatum base makes undesirable for use on the breast.


Colds And Flu Response Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Cairina moschata heart/liver autolysate and Breastfeeding

Safe

If consumed moderately liver and various organ meats are compatible in breast feeding.


Baptisia tinctoria root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Wild indigo is an herb. The root is used to make medicine.Wild indigo is used for infections such as diphtheria, influenza (flu), swine flu, the common cold and other upper respiratory tract infections, lymph node infections, scarlet fever, malaria, and typhoid. It is also used for sore tonsils (tonsillitis), sore throat, swelling of the mouth and throat, fever, boils, and Crohns disease. Some people apply wild indigo directly to the skin for ulcers, sore and painful nipples, as a douche for vaginal discharge, and for cleaning open and swollen wounds. Wild indigo is UNSAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin, long-term or in large doses. Large doses can cause vomiting, diarrhea, other intestinal problems, and spasms.

While breastfeeding wild indigo is likely not safe when taken by mouth or applied to the skin. Avoid use.


Gelsemium sempervirens root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

All parts of the false jasmine usually contain toxic alkaloids. Eating just one flower has reportedly been lethal to children. The plant can also cause skin allergies in some people and it is possible that the plant toxins can be absorbed through the skin, especially if there are cuts. Its not recommended to use false jasmine while breastfeeding. It is acceptable in homeopathic preparation.


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Pulsatilla vulgaris and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Note: Mostly safe in Homeopathic preparations


Sulfur and Breastfeeding

Safe

Note: Study and data for tropical use only

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.


I already used Colds And Flu Response and meanwhile I breastfed my baby should I be concerned?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Colds And Flu Response is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Colds And Flu Response, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Colds And Flu Response has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Colds And Flu Response, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Colds And Flu Response in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week