Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid Breastfeeding

Do you know that important immune protective proteins are present in breast milk? Breast milk also contains required vitamins, minerals, saturated and un saturated fats. These things are extremely important for development of healthy brain. If you are taking any medicine for short term or for the chronic reason then that passes in breast milk as well, that is why you should always check the drug with your health care provider. Here at DrLact we try to analyze drugs based on available researches and in this sheet we will present our analysis for Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid.

What is Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid used for?


May help temporarily relieve symptoms associated with depression.

I am currently breastfeeding and I want to know if using Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid is safe for my kid? Does it have any effect on milk production?

Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid. There is no credible study done on safety of Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid Breastfeeding Analsys


Choline hydroxide while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 69-72-7

It is topically used as a keratolytic, antiseptic, antifungal, dermatological and stomatological agent. At last update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found . Systemic absorption (distribution into the body) depends on the concentration of the product used and the duration of application. Absorption may reach 10 to 25% of the total amount applied on the skin. It is recommended not to use during lactation in large areas of skin or for prolonged periods. Available data on the elimination of Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin-ASA) in breast milk indicates it is clinically insignificant.No cases have been reported on Reye's syndrome by ASA through the breast milk which is considered very unlikely to occur with isolated and/or small doses used as antithrombotic treatments and anti-abortion measures, even less after application on the skin or topically in the mouth. Do not apply on the breast to prevent ingestion by the infant. If necessary, apply it after the feed and wipe it off thoroughly with water before the next feed.

Inositol while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 87-89-8

Product of natural origin and glucose isomer which is present in cereals, fruits, nuts and vegetables, as well as animal offal and milk. It is metabolized to glucose.Considered as part of vitamin B (Bh) with no clear evidence of its activity as such or signs of deficiency. It is found in breast milk. A higher concentration in the plasma of newborns than that in their mothers has been found. Breastfed infants show higher plasma levels of Inositol than formula-fed ones or after parenteral nutrition.It has been used in the newborn period to treat lung disorders and retinopathy associated to prematurity. No clear therapeutic indications nor cases of overdose poisoning with this product are known.

Lithium carbonate while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 554-13-2

It is excreted into breast milk in amounts that may be clinically significant and can be as high as a half of that reached in mother’s plasma and up to one third of the therapeutic level in the infant. In infants and newborns (5 days), premature babies and dehydrated or infected infants, who may show reduced clearance mechanisms for lithium, there have been reports of clear signs of lithium toxicity caused by ingestion of breast milk: cyanosis, lethargy, hypotonia or slight increase in TSH. However, there are numerous cases of infants whose mothers were on lithium who did not show any clinical, growth or neurodevelopmental problem at the short or long term. Breastfeeding is less risky for healthy term infants whose mothers are treated with lithium when she or her family has capacity enough to monitor the occurrence of adverse effects, medical supervision and, whenever necessary, monitoring of lithium levels in the mother-infant dyad. Mothers should stop taking lithium 1 to 2 days before delivery or cesarean section in order to decrease plasma levels in the newborn. Lithium may be, or not, a cause of increased Prolactin and galactorrhea.

Strychnos ignatii seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Dopamine hydrochloride while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

It may inhibit lactation.

Gold while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 7440-57-5

One case of facial edema that was barely related to this drug has been described. It has an extremely long half-life span.

Sodium chloride while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7647-14-5

Sodium chloride either as cooking salt, or, as oral rehydration solution, or, as IV fluid, is entirely compatible with BF.


Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Lithium carbonate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 554-13-2

Although lithium appears on many lists of drugs contraindicated during breastfeeding, other sources do not consider it an absolute contraindication, especially in infants over 2 months of age and during lithium monotherapy.[1][2][3][4] Numerous reports exist of infants who were breastfed during maternal lithium therapy without any signs of toxicity or developmental problems. Most were breastfed from birth and some continued to nurse for up to 1 year of maternal lithium therapy. Limited data suggest that lithium in milk can adversely affect the infant when its elimination is impaired, as in dehydration or in newborn or premature infants. Neonates may also have transplacentally acquired serum lithium levels. Because maternal lithium requirements and dosage may be increased during pregnancy, maternal serum levels should be monitored frequently postpartum and dosage reduced as necessary to avoid excessive infant exposure via breastmilk.[5] The long-term effects of lithium on infants are not certain, but limited data indicate no obvious problems in growth and development.[6] Lithium may be used in mothers of fullterm infants who are willing and able to monitor their infants. Discontinuing lithium 24 to 48 hours before Cesarean section delivery or at the onset of spontaneous labor and resuming the prepregnancy lithium dose immediately after delivery should minimize the infant's serum lithium concentration at birth.[7] Some investigators recommend monitoring infant serum lithium, serum creatinine, BUN, and TSH in intervals ranging from "periodic" to every 4 to 12 weeks during breastfeeding and maternal lithium therapy.[3][8][9] However, others recommend close pediatric follow-up of the infant and only selective laboratory monitoring as clinically indicated.[7] Breastfeeding should be discontinued immediately and the infant evaluated if the infant appears restless or lethargic or has feeding problems.[7]

Pulsatilla vulgaris while Breastfeeding



Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla and other related species) contains ranunculin, protoanemonin, and anemonin as well as triterpene saponins and flavonoids. The fresh plant is extremely irritating to the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous membranes. Allergic reactions have been reported to pulsatilla. Homeopathic preparations of pulsatilla are reportedly used for sore nipples and mastitis,[1] to reduce an overabundant milk supply,[2] or to increase milk supply.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No scientifically valid clinical trials support either of these uses. Because of a lack of information, other agents may be preferred in nursing mothers. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed

Dopamine hydrochloride while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 51-61-6

No information is available on the use of dopamine during breastfeeding. Because of its poor oral bioavailability and short half-life, any dopamine in milk is unlikely to affect the infant. Intravenous dopamine infusion may decrease milk production. Dopamine is known to reduce serum prolactin in nonnursing women, but no information is available on its effect on milk production in nursing mothers.

Sulfur while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7704-34-9

Sulfur 5% to 10% in a petrolatum base is safe for topical use in children, including infants under 2 months of age.[1] This makes it a useful alternative to organic insecticides for treating scabies in nursing mothers; however, the petrolatum base makes undesirable for use on the breast.


Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Pulsatilla vulgaris and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Note: Mostly safe in Homeopathic preparations


Sulfur and Breastfeeding

Safe

Note: Study and data for tropical use only

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.


I already used Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid and meanwhile I breastfed my baby should I be concerned?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


My health care provider has asked me to use Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid, what to do?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Depression Composition | Not Applicable Liquid in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week