Lym D Breastfeeding

Do you know that important immune protective proteins are present in breast milk? Breast milk also contains required vitamins, minerals, saturated and un saturated fats. These things are extremely important for development of healthy brain. If you are taking any medicine for short term or for the chronic reason then that passes in breast milk as well, that is why you should always check the drug with your health care provider. Here at DrLact we try to analyze drugs based on available researches and in this sheet we will present our analysis for Lym D.

What is Lym D used for?


For temporary relief of aches and pains of joints and muscles as a consequence of infection.

Is Lym D usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Lym D safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Lym D. There is no credible study done on safety of Lym D while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Lym D as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Lym D Breastfeeding Analsys


Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)

Taraxacum officinale while Breastfeeding

Safe

The roots and leaves of the plant in salads both as food and herbal medicine are used.It contains inulin, terpenes, phytosterols, flavonoids, coumarins and potassium salts in large quantities.Attributed Properties: cholagogue, laxative, orexigenic. diureticIndication by the German Commission E Ministry of Health: dyspepsia, cholelithiasis, anorexia.Indications by the European Medicament Agency (EMA): diuretic. Non toxic. There is no evidence of its effectiveness as galactogogue.Best galactogogue is a frequent on-demand breastfeeding and proper technique. Its wide use, low toxicity and since it is also consumed as food, a moderate consumption during lactation is considered of little or no risk. Precaution is recommended before taking herbal infusions:1. Ensure a reliable source: poisoning occurred by confusion with another plant that resulted to be toxic, poisoning from heavy metals and food poisoning by contamination with bacteria or fungi.2. Avoid excessive consumption. The "natural" products are not good in any amount: plants contain active substances from which come out much of our traditional pharmacopoeia and can cause poisoning if eaten in exaggerated quantity or prolonged time.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Lycopodium clavatum spore while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Aerial summits and spores of this fern are used. Traditionally use as a diuretic and intestinal spasm relief drug. Also used for abrasions and skin irritation. It may be a cause of asthma and contact dermatitis.


Lym D Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84696-11-7; 90028-20

Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida) contain high molecular weight polysaccharides (e.g., heteroxylan, arabinogalactan) and lower molecular weight compounds (e.g., alkylamides, caffeoyl conjugates such as cichoric acid and echinacosides), but no single chemical is known to be responsible for echinacea's biological activity. Some products have been standardized based on echinacoside, and others on cichoric acid. Echinacea has no specific uses during breastfeeding, but is commonly used orally to treat or prevent upper respiratory infections. It is also used topically to treat skin infections. Excretion of some of the purportedly active alkamides was found in breastmilk in one mother. No data exist on the safety and efficacy of echinacea in nursing mothers or infants. In general, echinacea is well tolerated with gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and constipation, skin rash and rarely allergic reactions reported. It may also alter the metabolism of some dugs metabolized by the P450 enzyme system. Some sources indicate that echinacea is safe in recommended doses,[1] while others recommend avoiding it during breastfeeding because of the lack of published safety data. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Goldenseal while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84603-60-1

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) root contains berberine and other isoquinoline alkaloids. Goldenseal has traditionally been used as an anti-infective both systemically and topically, although high-quality studies of its efficacy and safety are lacking. It has also been used to mask illicit drugs in the urine, although it appears to be ineffective with modern laboratory methods. Goldenseal has been used topically by nursing mothers to treat sore nipples.[1] No data exist on the excretion of any components of goldenseal into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of goldenseal in nursing mothers. Berberine can displace bilirubin from serum albumin, causing concern about exposure of newborn infants, because bilirubin can build up in the infant's brain, causing brain damage. However, the extent of berberine's passage from the mother to the infant is unknown. Most sources recommend avoiding exposure of neonates to goldenseal via breastfeeding or otherwise.[2][3][4] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]


Lym D Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Goldenseal and Breastfeeding

Unsafe


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant — or anything thats touched it — can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.


Ledum palustre twig and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Labrador tea is a plant. The leaves and flowering shoots are used to make medicine. People take Labrador tea for sore throat, chest congestion, coughs, lung infections, and other chest ailments. They also take it for diarrhea, kidney problems, joint and muscle pain (rheumatism), headache, and cancer.

Women use it to cause an abortion or treat “female disorders.”Some people add Labrador tea to bath water or apply it directly to the skin to treat skin problems. The flowers and leaves of the plant are used to prepare tea. However, frequent intake of the same have some side effects like headaches, indigestion, cramps, and vomiting.

Labrador tea has narcotic properties. If taken in concentrations that are too high, it can cause symptoms of intoxication that can lead to paralysis and death. Due to its narcotic properties Its likely unsafe to use Labrador tea if you are breastfeeding. If you are pregnant It might cause an abortion.



I already used Lym D and meanwhile I breastfed my baby should I be concerned?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Lym D is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Lym D, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Lym D has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Lym D, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Lym D in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week