Cosmestat Breastfeeding

Breast milk is superior in nutrition, It provides resistance against infections and allergies, It is naturally sterile. Despite all the advantages of breastfeeding some mothers choose to pause the breastfeeding in fear of harmful effects of medicines passing in breast milk. Are you wondering about breastfeeding and using Cosmestat ? Know what is Cosmestat and how it can affect your breast milk and whether Cosmestat is safe for your kid or not.

What is Cosmestat used for?


For temporary relief of sinus congestion, dry cough in the evening and rhinitis.** **These statements are based upon traditional homeopathic practice. They have not been reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Is Cosmestat usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Cosmestat safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Cosmestat. There is no credible study done on safety of Cosmestat while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Cosmestat as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Cosmestat Breastfeeding Analsys


Alfalfa while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 8015-60-9

Aerial summits and seeds are used. It contains a great deal of flavonoids, steroids, cumestans, vitamins and minerals Attributed effects but not clinically tested are: agonist of estrogen, antianemic and diuretic. Also, there is not reliable data that would support its use as galactagogue. At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found. Because its estrogenic effect it should not be consumed during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Caravanina which is one of the components, is toxic if continuously used. Pancytopenia, Hemolytic anemia and Lupus Erythematosus have been described as induced by frequent consumption of germinated-seeds or tablets of alfalfa. Cautious measures before consumption of herbal infusions should include: 1. Make sure that the source is reliable: occurrance of intoxication cases after mistakenly use of a toxic plant, poisoning by consumption of heavy metal containing substances or contaminated food by bacterial or fungal toxins. 2. Avoid excessive use. The “natural products” are not harmless at whatever dosage: the plants contain active substances that have been the source of our common pharmaceutical drugs. They may be a cause of poisoning if consumed in high quantity or for a long time.

Avena sativa flowering top while Breastfeeding

Safe

The seeds of this leguminous plant are used.
Content: carbohydrates, proteins, saponins, vitamins, minerals . 
Assigned properties: appetite stimulant, lowering of lipemia and glycemic (Gong 2016).Indications according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: Anorexia, Atopic Dermatitis.

 Widely used as a galactogogue in many cultures around the world (Ayers 2000, Winterfeld 2012, Sim 2013, The Royal Women's .. 2013, Bazzano 2016).

 Case-control studies looking for evidence on the increment of milk production associated to the use of fenugreek are few (Turkyılmaz 2011, Ghasemi 2015), along with a variety of methodological deficiencies. Other studies have failed to find such an effect with the use of fenugreek (Damanik 2006).
Studies with an appropriate design are needed to provide high quality evidence to make clinical recommendations on its use (Forinash 2012, Zapantis 2012, Committee LM AEP 2012, Mortel 2013, Bazzano 2016)

 A higher antioxidant effect in the breastmilk of women who have consumed mixed infusions containing this or other herbs has not been shown (Kavurt 2013).

 Given the wide spread use and lack of toxicity of this herb, a moderate consumption would be compatible with breastfeeding, yet high doses may produce hypoglycemia (EMA 2011, Gong 2016) and, because of the odor appearing in the urine of the infant, a lab test may be required to make a differential diagnosis with maple syrup disease of the newborn (Sewell 1999, Korman 2001).
Avoid the use of a galactogogue without a sanitary control.

 Best galactagogue results are achieved through on-demand breastfeeding along with an adequate technique in a mother who is able to maintain self-confidence (ABM 2011, Mannion 2012). Precautions when taking plant preparations: 1. Ensure that they are from a reliable source: poisoning has occurred due to confusing one plant with another with toxic properties, as well as poisoning from heavy metals extracted from the ground and food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi. 2. Do not take in large amounts; follow recommendations from professional experts in phytotherapy. "Natural" products are not always good in any quantity: plants contain active substances from which much of our traditional pharmacopoeia has been obtained and can result in poisoning or act as endocrine disruptors if taken in excessive amounts or time periods.

Iodine while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 7553-56-2

Disinfectant that contains high amount (2-7%) of Iodine in solution with alcohol or water (Lugol's solution) Not absorbed through intact skin of adults. However, it may trespass the inflamed skin, wounds, mucosa surfaces like vagina, in which case can reach concentration in grams in the human serum (1 g = 1,000 milligrams = 1,000,000 micrograms). Normal daily allowance is considered to be as high as 100 to 150 micrograms that increases to 200 – 300 micrograms in pregnancy or nursing period. The latter means less than one third of a milligram. Iodine is concentrated into breast milk with a level that could reach 20 times higher than the concentration in the blood. It has been found higher levels of Iodine, altered results of neonatal screening test for thyroid function, and, transient hypothyroidism in infants whose mothers were exposed to Iodine Povidone. Use should be avoid in the Delivery Room, Operating Room (C-section), Neonatal Units, Toddler admision areas and during the breastfeeding period. Sporadic or inadvertent use, specially on normal skin, does not require special test or procedures because it does not pose higher risk to the child.

Sodium chloride while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7647-14-5

Sodium chloride either as cooking salt, or, as oral rehydration solution, or, as IV fluid, is entirely compatible with BF.


Cosmestat Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Alfalfa while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8015-60-9

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves and sprouts contain saponins, estrogenic isoflavinoids (e.g., dianzein genistein), vitamin K, and the amino acid L-canavanine. Alfalfa is a purported galactogogue and is included in some proprietary mixtures promoted to increase milk supply;[1][2][3][4][5] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[6] Dianzein and genistein are excreted into breastmilk in small amounts,[7][8][9] but have not been measured specifically after alfalfa intake. No data exist on the excretion of other components of alfalfa into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of alfalfa in nursing mothers or infants. Alfalfa is generally well tolerated and is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Worsening of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported, possibly caused by immune system stimulation by L-canavanine. Because of its vitamin K content, alfalfa should be avoided in persons taking warfarin. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Iodine while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7553-56-2

Iodine is an essential trace nutrient for all infants that a normal component of breastmilk. Infant requirements are estimated to be 15 mcg/kg daily in fullterm infants and 30 mcg/kg daily in premature infants.[1] Systematic reviews and studies on iodine nutrition found that iodine in breastmilk is adequate in iodine-sufficient countries, but in countries with iodine fortification of foods, many mothers did not obtain adequate iodine and that additional supplementation was desirable.[2][3][4][5] In iodine-deficient areas, supplementation of breastfeeding mothers with iodine appears to be more effective than direct supplementation of the infant in reducing infant iodine deficiency.[6] The American Thyroid Association recommends that breastfeeding women should supplement their diet with a daily oral supplement that contains 150 mcg of iodine, but sustained iodine intake while breastfeeding that exceeds 500 to 1100 mcg daily should be avoided.[7] A survey in the United States between 2011 and 2014 found that only 19% of lactating women used a dietary supplement that contained iodine.[8] The use of excessive amounts of iodine in the mother near term and during breastfeeding (e.g., seaweed soup) can increase breastmilk iodine levels and cause transient hypothyroidism in breastfed infants. The absorption of iodine can be marked after application to open wounds or mucous membranes. Exposure of mothers to unnecessary iodine who are or will be breastfeeding should be avoided or minimized to the extent possible by avoiding its use on maternal mucous membranes (e.g., vaginal use, wound therapy), avoiding prolonged contact time, avoiding repeated applications, and applying it to the smallest possible surface areas of the body. It is possible that maternal exposure to iodine near term could interfere with thyroid studies done as a part of newborn screening tests.

Thyroid, bovine while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8028-36-2

Thyroid is an animal-derived mixture of levothyroxine (T4) and liothyronine (T3), which are normal components of human milk. Limited data on exogenous replacement doses of levothyroxine during breastfeeding indicate no adverse effects in infants. If thyroid is required by the mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding. The American Thyroid Association recommends that subclinical and overt hypothyroidism should be treated with levothyroxine in lactating women seeking to breastfeed.[1] Thyroid dosage requirement may be increased in the postpartum period compared to prepregnancy requirements patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.[2]

Cortisone acetate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 53-06-5

Cortisone is a normal component of breastmilk that passes from the mother's bloodstream into milk and might have a role in intestinal maturation, the intestinal microbiome, growth, body composition or neurodevelopment, but adequate studies are lacking.[1] Concentrations follow a diurnal rhythm, with the highest concentrations in the morning at about 7:00 am and the lowest concentrations in the late afternoon and evening.[2][3] Cortisone has not been studied in breastmilk after exogenous administration in pharmacologic amounts. Although it is unlikely that dangerous amounts of cortisone would reach the infant, a better studied alternate drug might be preferred. Local injections, such as for tendinitis, would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants, but might occasionally cause temporary loss of milk supply. Cortisone concentrations in breastmilk are not affected by storage for 36 hours at room temperature, during multiple freeze-thaw cycles, nor Holder pasteurization (62.5 degrees C for 30 minutes).[4][5]


Cosmestat Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.


Thyroid, bovine and Breastfeeding

Safe


Cortisone acetate and Breastfeeding

Low Risk



What if I already have used Cosmestat?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Cosmestat is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Cosmestat, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Cosmestat has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Cosmestat, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Cosmestat in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week