Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg Breastfeeding
Most health expert recommend six month of exclusive breastfeeding but statics suggest that numbers are not good, almost 95% mothers start breastfeeding but this number drops to 40% in first three month and further it drops to 15% till fifth month. Sometime its due to need of medication usage. Because of these statics its important to provide good information on safety of drugs in breastfeeding so that it can be improved when possible. In this FAQ sheet we will discuss about exposure to Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg while breastfeeding. We will also discuss about common side effects and warnings associated with Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg.

What is Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg used for?


To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of PCE tablets and other antibacterial drugs, PCE tablets should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy. PCE tablets are indicated in the treatment of infections caused by susceptible strains of the designated microorganisms in the diseases listed below: Upper respiratory tract infections of mild to moderate degree caused by Streptococcus pyogenes; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Haemophilus influenzae (when used concomitantly with adequate doses of sulfonamides, since many strains of H. influenzae are not susceptible to the erythromycin concentrations ordinarily achieved). (See appropriate sulfonamide labeling for prescribing information.) Lower respiratory tract infections of mild to moderate severity caused by Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Listeriosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. Respiratory tract infections due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Skin and skin structure infections of mild to moderate severity caused by Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus (resistant staphylococci may emerge during treatment). Pertussis (whooping cough) caused by Bordetella pertussis. Erythromycin is effective in eliminating the organism from the nasopharynx of infected individuals, rendering them noninfectious. Some clinical studies suggest that erythromycin may be helpful in the prophylaxis of pertussis in exposed susceptible individuals. Diphtheria: Infections due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae, as an adjunct to antitoxin, to prevent establishment of carriers and to eradicate the organism in carriers. Erythrasma: In the treatment of infections due to Corynebacterium minutissimum. Intestinal amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica (oral erythromycins only). Extraenteric amebiasis requires treatment with other agents. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Erythrocinâ„¢ Lactobionate-I.V. (erythromycin lactobionate for injection, USP) followed by erythromycin base orally, as an alternative drug in treatment of acute pelvic inflammatory disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae in female patients with a history of sensitivity to penicillin. Patients should have a serologic test for syphilis before receiving erythromycin as treatment of gonorrhea and a follow-up serologic test for syphilis after 3 months. Erythromycins are indicated for treatment of the following infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis: conjunctivitis of the newborn, pneumonia of infancy, and urogenital infections during pregnancy. When tetracyclines are contraindicated or not tolerated, erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of uncomplicated urethral, endocervical, or rectal infections in adults due to Chlamydia trachomatis. When tetracyclines are contraindicated or not tolerated, erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum. Primary syphilis caused by Treponema pallidum. Erythromycin (oral forms only) is an alternative choice of treatment for primary syphilis in patients allergic to the penicillins. In treatment of primary syphilis, spinal fluid should be examined before treatment and as part of the follow-up after therapy. Legionnaires' Disease caused by Legionella pneumophila. Although no controlled clinical efficacy studies have been conducted, in vitro and limited preliminary clinical data suggest that erythromycin may be effective in treating Legionnaires' Disease. Prophylaxis Prevention of Initial Attacks of Rheumatic Fever Penicillin is considered by the American Heart Association to be the drug of choice in the prevention of initial attacks of rheumatic fever (treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes infections of the upper respiratory tract e.g., tonsillitis, or pharyngitis).1 Erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of penicillin-allergic patients. The therapeutic dose should be administered for ten days. Prevention of Recurrent Attacks of Rheumatic Fever Penicillin or sulfonamides are considered by the American Heart Association to be the drugs of choice in the prevention of recurrent attacks of rheumatic fever. In patients who are allergic to penicillin and sulfonamides, oral erythromycin is recommended by the American Heart Association in the long-term prophylaxis of streptococcal pharyngitis (for the prevention of recurrent attacks of rheumatic fever).1

I am breastfeeding mother and I am using Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg. Can it have any bad effect on my kid? Shall I search for better alternative?

Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg low risk for breastfeeding
Erythromycin is the one and only active ingredient present in Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg. Erythromycin in itself is a low risk drug for lactation so it is easy to understand that Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg also comes in category of Low Risk item while breastfeeding. Below is the summary of Erythromycin in breastfeeding.

Statement of Manufacturer/Labeler about breastfeeding usage
Nursing Mothers Erythromycin is excreted in human milk. Caution should be exercised when erythromycin is administered to a nursing woman.

Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys


Erythromycin while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 114-07-8

Excreted in very low levels into breast milk. Commonly used for pediatric treatment of small babies; it is very well tolerated by infants. Erythromycin is a macrolide that has been related to hypertrophic pyloric stenosis after early exposition through the breast milk. Avoiding its use in the first post-partum month would be a cautious measure. Be aware of the possibility of false negative results of bacterial cultures when the mother is on antibiotics. Also, diarrheal disease due to imbalance of intestinal flora is possible Small doses used for treatment of dermatologic and ophthalmologic conditions, together with a very low level in the mother’s plasma make very unlikely a significant excretion into breast milk. Topically used Erythromycin is safe while breastfeeding. Systemic treatments would be safer after the first month of life. The American Academy of Pediatrics rates it usually compatible with breastfeeding. List of Essential Medicines WHO 2002: Compatible with breastfeeding.


Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Erythromycin while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 114-07-8

Is Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg safe while breastfeeding

Because of the low levels of erythromycin in breastmilk and safe administration directly to infants, it is acceptable in nursing mothers. The small amounts in milk are unlikely to cause adverse effects in the infant. Monitor the infant for irritability and possible effects on the gastrointestinal flora, such as diarrhea, candidiasis (thrush, diaper rash). One case report and unconfirmed epidemiologic evidence indicates that the risk of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in infants might occur during maternal use of erythromycin during breastfeeding; however, if it occurs, the frequency is very low. Infant side effects are unlikely with topical application for acne, although topical application to the nipple may increase the risk of diarrhea in the infant. Only water-miscible cream or gel products should be applied to the breast because ointments may expose the infant to high levels of mineral paraffins via licking.[1]


Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg safe for breastfeeding

What should I do if already breastfed my kid after using Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg?

Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg is in the category of low risk, if you have already used it then its not a big deal if health and behavior of baby is good. However your health care provider shall be aware of the fact that you have used Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg so you should inform him based on your convenience.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg, is it safe?

Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg comes in category of low risk and if your doctor is aware that you are breastfeeding it should be ok to use without much concerns.


If I am using Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not much monitoring required while using Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Pce | Erythromycin 0.5 Mg in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week