Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg Breastfeeding

Modern medicine has evolved so much so that sooner or later every breastfeeding mother needs to take it in one form or other. Medication that is present in mothers blood will transfer into her breast milk to some extent. Most drugs do so at low levels and pose no real risk to infants but then there are some exceptions. In This post will discuss whether Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg is safe in breast-feeding or not.

What is Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg ?


Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules are indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients aged 6 years and older. The effectiveness of dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules in the treatment of ADHD in patients aged 6 years and older was established in two placebo-controlled studies in patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for ADHD [see Clinical Studies (14)]. A diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; DSM-IV) implies the presence of hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment and were present before age 7 years. The symptoms must cause clinically significant impairment, e.g., in social, academic, or occupational functioning, and be present in two or more settings, e.g., school (or work) and at home. The symptoms must not be better accounted for by another mental disorder. For the Inattentive Type, at least six of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: lack of attention to details/careless mistakes; lack of sustained attention; poor listener; failure to follow through on tasks; poor organization; avoids tasks requiring sustained mental effort; loses things; easily distracted; forgetful. For the Hyperactive-Impulsive Type, at least six of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: fidgeting/squirming; leaving seat; inappropriate running/climbing; difficulty with quiet activities; “on the go”; excessive talking; blurting answers; can’t wait turn; intrusive. The Combined Types requires both inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive criteria to be met. Special Diagnostic Considerations: Specific etiology of this syndrome is unknown, and there is no single diagnostic test. Adequate diagnosis requires the use not only of medical but of special psychological, educational, and social resources. Learning may or may not be impaired. The diagnosis must be based upon a complete history and evaluation of the child and not solely on the presence of the required number of DSM-IV characteristics. Need for Comprehensive Treatment Program: Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules are indicated as an integral part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include other measures (psychological, educational, social) for patients with this syndrome. Drug treatment may not be indicated for all children with this syndrome. Stimulants are not intended for use in the child who exhibits symptoms secondary to environmental factors and/or other primary psychiatric disorders, including psychosis. Appropriate educational placement is essential and psychosocial intervention is often helpful. When remedial measures alone are insufficient, the decision to prescribe stimulant medication will depend upon the physician’s assessment of the chronicity and severity of the child’s symptoms. Long-Term Use: The effectiveness of dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules for long-term use, i.e., for more than 7 weeks, has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, the physician who elects to use dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient [see Dosage and Administration (2.3)]. Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules are a CNS stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients aged 6 years and older. (1)

Is using Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg safe or dangerous while breastfeeding?

Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg safe for breastfeeding
Active ingredient in Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg is Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride and based on our analysis of Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride it appears that using Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg is safe in breastfeeding. Below is analysis of Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride while breastfeeding.

Statement of Manufacturer/Labeler about breastfeeding usage
8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether dexmethylphenidate is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised if dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release capsules are administered to a nursing woman. Information from four published case reports on the use of racemic methylphenidate during breast-feeding suggest that at maternal doses of 35 to 80 mg/day, milk concentrations of methylphenidate range from undetectable to 15.4 ng/mL. Based on these limited data, the calculated infant daily dose for an exclusively breastfed infant would be about 0.4 to 2.9 mcg/kg/day or about 0.2% to 0.7% of the maternal weight adjusted dose.

Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys


Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 40431-64-9

Dexmethylphenidate is an isomer of methylphenidate. No information is available on the clinical use of dexmethylphenidate during breastfeeding; however, the manufacturer estimates that a fully breastfed infant would receive a relative dose of 0.2 to 0.7% of the maternal weight adjusted dose. In dosages prescribed for medical indications, limited evidence indicates that methylphenidate levels in milk are very low and not detectable in infant serum. The effects of methylphenidate in milk on the neurological development of the infant have not been well studied. If methylphenidate is required by the mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding.[1] It is possible that large dosages of methylphenidate might interfere with milk production, especially in women whose lactation is not well established.


Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride and Breastfeeding

Safe


Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg and breastfeeding

I am nursing mother and I have already used Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg, what should I do?

Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg is safe in breastfeeding and should not create any health problem for your baby but in case you feel any health issue associated with Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg you should contact your doctor or health care provider. Be it pregnancy or lactation you shall keep your doctor informed.


My doctor has prescribed me Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg, what should I do?

Definitely, Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg is safe in lactation for baby. No wonder your doctor has recommended it.


If I am using Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg, will my baby need extra monitoring?

No extra baby monitoring required while mother is using Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride | Dexmethylphenidate Hydrochloride 30 Mg in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week