Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief Breastfeeding
Breast milk is superior in nutrition, It provides resistance against infections and allergies, It is naturally sterile. Despite all the advantages of breastfeeding some mothers choose to pause the breastfeeding in fear of harmful effects of medicines passing in breast milk. Are you wondering about breastfeeding and using Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief ? Know what is Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief and how it can affect your breast milk and whether Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief is safe for your kid or not.

What is Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief used for?


For the temporary relief of anxiety symptoms including: fear nervousness sensitivity minor mood swings upset and tightness in stomach and body

Purpose: Aconitum napellus HPUS............................Emotional Tension Alfala HPUS..............................................Gloominess Argentum nitricum HPUS............................Tremulousness Arsenicum album HPUS.............................Anguish Aurum metallicum HPUS............................Hopelessness Avena Sativa HPUS...................................Nervous Exhaustion Baryta carbonica HPUS..............................Loss of self-confidence Calcarea phosphorica HPUS.......................Forgetfullness Chamomilla HPUS.....................................Impatience Gelsemium sempervirens HPUS.................Emotional Excitement Glonoinum HPUS.......................................Extreme irritability Humulus lupulus HPUS...............................Nervous tremors Ignatia amara HPUS....................................Hysteria Kali arsenicosum HPUS..............................Nervousness Kali phosphoricum HPUS............................Fretfulness Natrum phosphoricum HPUS.......................Fear Passiflora incarnata HPUS..........................Abnormal sleep Phosphorus HPUS.....................................Low spirits Staphysagria HPUS...................................Emotional sensitivity Stramonium HPUS....................................Mood Swings

Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief while breastfeeding safe or not? Can there be any side effects for infant while using it during breastfeeding?

Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief. There is no credible study done on safety of Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief Breastfeeding Analsys


Aconitum napellus while Breastfeeding

Safe

The flowers and roots and leaves of this herbaceous plant are used. It contains sesquiterpene lactones, essential oil, flavonoids and traces of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Topical use on whole skin. Indications in traditional medicine without evidence of its effectiveness: topical anti-inflammatory in bruises, sprains and localized muscle pain (EMA 2014). Do not apply to damaged skin It is very toxic orally (Anderson 2017), having described gastroenteritis, cardiac arrhythmia, neurological problems and death (WHO 2007 p.77, nal 2001) in people who took it and a case of severe hemolytic anemia in 9-day-old newborn whose mother was taking arnica infusion (Miller 2009). At the date of the last update, we did not find published data on its excretion in breast milk. The small dose and poor plasma absorption of most topical dermatological preparations make it unlikely that a significant amount will pass into breast milk. Do not apply on the breast so that the infant does not ingest it, or in large areas or for prolonged periods to avoid systemic absorption. Hands should be washed after applying arnica to avoid possible contact with the infants mouth.

Alfalfa while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 8015-60-9

Aerial summits and seeds are used. It contains a great deal of flavonoids, steroids, cumestans, vitamins and minerals Attributed effects but not clinically tested are: agonist of estrogen, antianemic and diuretic. Also, there is not reliable data that would support its use as galactagogue. At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found. Because its estrogenic effect it should not be consumed during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Caravanina which is one of the components, is toxic if continuously used. Pancytopenia, Hemolytic anemia and Lupus Erythematosus have been described as induced by frequent consumption of germinated-seeds or tablets of alfalfa. Cautious measures before consumption of herbal infusions should include: 1. Make sure that the source is reliable: occurrance of intoxication cases after mistakenly use of a toxic plant, poisoning by consumption of heavy metal containing substances or contaminated food by bacterial or fungal toxins. 2. Avoid excessive use. The “natural products” are not harmless at whatever dosage: the plants contain active substances that have been the source of our common pharmaceutical drugs. They may be a cause of poisoning if consumed in high quantity or for a long time.

Silver nitrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7761-88-8

Avoid using it on the breast or cleanse thoroughly before nursing.

Gold while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 7440-57-5

One case of facial edema that was barely related to this drug has been described. It has an extremely long half-life span.

Avena sativa flowering top while Breastfeeding

Safe

The seeds of this leguminous plant are used.
Content: carbohydrates, proteins, saponins, vitamins, minerals . 
Assigned properties: appetite stimulant, lowering of lipemia and glycemic (Gong 2016).Indications according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: Anorexia, Atopic Dermatitis.

 Widely used as a galactogogue in many cultures around the world (Ayers 2000, Winterfeld 2012, Sim 2013, The Royal Women's .. 2013, Bazzano 2016).

 Case-control studies looking for evidence on the increment of milk production associated to the use of fenugreek are few (Turkyılmaz 2011, Ghasemi 2015), along with a variety of methodological deficiencies. Other studies have failed to find such an effect with the use of fenugreek (Damanik 2006).
Studies with an appropriate design are needed to provide high quality evidence to make clinical recommendations on its use (Forinash 2012, Zapantis 2012, Committee LM AEP 2012, Mortel 2013, Bazzano 2016)

 A higher antioxidant effect in the breastmilk of women who have consumed mixed infusions containing this or other herbs has not been shown (Kavurt 2013).

 Given the wide spread use and lack of toxicity of this herb, a moderate consumption would be compatible with breastfeeding, yet high doses may produce hypoglycemia (EMA 2011, Gong 2016) and, because of the odor appearing in the urine of the infant, a lab test may be required to make a differential diagnosis with maple syrup disease of the newborn (Sewell 1999, Korman 2001).
Avoid the use of a galactogogue without a sanitary control.

 Best galactagogue results are achieved through on-demand breastfeeding along with an adequate technique in a mother who is able to maintain self-confidence (ABM 2011, Mannion 2012). Precautions when taking plant preparations: 1. Ensure that they are from a reliable source: poisoning has occurred due to confusing one plant with another with toxic properties, as well as poisoning from heavy metals extracted from the ground and food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi. 2. Do not take in large amounts; follow recommendations from professional experts in phytotherapy. "Natural" products are not always good in any quantity: plants contain active substances from which much of our traditional pharmacopoeia has been obtained and can result in poisoning or act as endocrine disruptors if taken in excessive amounts or time periods.

Calcium cation while Breastfeeding

Safe

Various calcium salts (Acetate, Carbonate, Chloride, Citrate, Phosphate, Gluceptate, Glucobionato, Lactate, Laxctobionato Pidolate, Silicate) are used in the management of hypocalcemia, supplements for treating calcium deficiency states and antacids ( Carbonate and Silicate) Daily requirement of calcium during lactation are 1 g (1.3 g in children under 20 years).Calcium supplements in the diet does not affect the concentration of calcium in milk.Excessive intake of calcium is not good for health. During lactation, consumption of calcium should not exceed 2.5 g a day. WHO List of Essential Medicines 2002 states that it is compatible with breastfeeding.

Chamomile while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 520-36-5

It is a widely used plant even in infants. Because of lack of toxicity, a moderate use is considered to be safe. If topically used, do not apply it on the nipple because risk of contact dermatitis has been reported. There are two different species with similar properties: 1) Common or Sweet Chamomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita). 2) Roman, English or Bitter Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis o Chamaemelum nobile). Inflorescence of the herb is used. Contains Essential Oil, Flavonoids, Lactones and Tannins. Unproven properties are: Anti-spasmodic. Digestive, Anti-inflammatory, Sedative.

Nitroglycerin while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 55-63-0

Vasodilator used to treat cardiac disorders like ischemia and mainly anal fissures.It is also used during pregnancy as a tocolytic drug in cases of threatened preterm labor and eclampsia.It has been used to treat heart disorders in babies and children. Even to treat anal fissures in children under 1 year, and noteworthy, in ischemic issues on premature infants without side effects.It is administered intravenously, orally, sublingually, on skin patches, ointment ... Because of a moderately-high volume of distribution and very fast metabolism (Tmax and t1 / 2 minutes) it is highly unlikely the passage of significant amounts to the breast milk, especially when applied topically. This explains why it has not been observed any troubles in 40 infants whose mothers with anal fissures were treated with nitroglycerin ointment application even for periods of 12 months. Mothers have complained of headaches that commonly occur with the use of various vasodilators drugs. The amount of nitrate / nitrite in this type of vasodilator drugs is of few milligrams, therefore, toxicity associated to nitrates such as methemoglobinemia in breastfed infants from treated mothers has not been reported (The dose of nitrite is Rectogesic 1.5 mg / 12 hours).

Strychnos ignatii seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Potassium arsenite anhydrous while Breastfeeding

Safe

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Potassium phosphate, dibasic while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7447-40-7

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Hops while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 977070-67-9

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Passiflora incarnata flower while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

At latest update, relevant information on excretion into breast milk was not found. Aerial summits of this climbing plant are used. Constituents are: flavonoids, pyranics, heterosides, alkaloids. Attributed effects with only weak scientific evidence on effectiveness are: sedative, hypnotic, anti-spasmodic. Because of paucity of data on toxicity, recommendations done are to use it at low doses for short term periods. The European Medicines Agency does not authorize its use for children younger than 12 years old , pregnancy and breastfeeding. When used while breastfeeding, it is recommended to use it at low dose for a short-term period. Following-up the infant for sedation is recommended.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.


Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Alfalfa while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8015-60-9

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves and sprouts contain saponins, estrogenic isoflavinoids (e.g., dianzein genistein), vitamin K, and the amino acid L-canavanine. Alfalfa is a purported galactogogue and is included in some proprietary mixtures promoted to increase milk supply;[1][2][3][4][5] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[6] Dianzein and genistein are excreted into breastmilk in small amounts,[7][8][9] but have not been measured specifically after alfalfa intake. No data exist on the excretion of other components of alfalfa into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of alfalfa in nursing mothers or infants. Alfalfa is generally well tolerated and is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Worsening of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported, possibly caused by immune system stimulation by L-canavanine. Because of its vitamin K content, alfalfa should be avoided in persons taking warfarin. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Barium carbonate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7727-43-7

Because barium sulfate is not absorbed after oral or rectal administration, it will not enter the milk, reach the bloodstream of the infant or cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants. No special precautions are required.

Chamomile while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8002-66-2

Two different plant species with similar effects are known as chamomile: German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Both contain similar ingredients, including sesquiterpenes (e.g., bisabolol, farnesene), sesquiterpenelactones (e.g., chamazulene, matricin), flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin), and volatile oils. Chamomile is used orally as a sedative and for gastrointestinal conditions; it is used topically for wound healing. Both herbal and homeopathic preparations have been used to treat mastitis and cracked, bleeding nipples.[1] Chamomile has been used as a galactogogue;[2][3] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] Chamomile is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) for use in food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a spice, seasoning, or flavoring agent. No data exist on the safety of chamomile in nursing mothers or infants, although rare sensitization may occur (see below).[5] It has been safely and effectively used alone and with other herbs in infants for the treatment of colic, diarrhea, and other conditions,[6][7][8][9] so the smaller amounts expected (but not demonstrated) in breastmilk are likely not to be harmful with usual maternal doses. Note Clostridium botulinum (botulism) spores have been found in some loose-leaf chamomile teas sold in health food stores. Topical chamomile is a known sensitizing agent, even with homeopathic products.[10] Two women developed contact dermatitis of the nipples and areolas after applying Kamillosan ointment for cracked nipples. The product was purchased in England and contained 10.5% Roman chamomile extracts and oil. Reactions were confirmed to be caused by Roman chamomile by patch testing in both women. Drinking chamomile tea can exacerbate topical skin rashes and has caused anaphylaxis in sensitized individuals.[11] Chamomile has possible cross-reactivity with other members of the aster family (e.g., echinacea, feverfew, and milk thistle).[5] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Nitroglycerin while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 55-63-0

Topical use of nitroglycerin for anal fissures by nursing mothers appears to have no adverse effects on their breastfed infants. Topical use on the nipples has been used for alleviation of Raynaud phenomenon of the nipples, but only after cessation of breastfeeding.[1] Nitroglycerin should not be used topically on the nipples during breastfeeding. Sublingual and intravenous nitroglycerin have not been studied during breastfeeding. Observe infants for flushing and discomfort after breastfeeding.

Hops while Breastfeeding



Hops (Humulus lupulus) contains bitter acids, flavonoids, phytoestrogens (e.g., 8-prenylnaringenin), and essential oil. Hops is a purported galactogogue.[1] Some animal evidence indicates that a polysaccharide in hops can increase serum prolactin.[2] However, a small study in humans found that a hops soup appeared to lower serum prolactin levels.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No data exist on the excretion of any components of hops into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of hops in nursing mothers or infants. Hops is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Hops can cause sedation and should be avoided while taking other sedating drugs and in patients with depression. Allergy to hops occurs rarely. Some sources recommend avoiding hops during breastfeeding because of its phytoestrogen content. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Sodium phosphate, dibasic, heptahydrate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7558-79-4; 7558-80-7

Phosphate is a normal constituent of breastmilk. Phosphate concentrations have not been measured in breastmilk after large maternal doses of sodium phosphate, such a 30 gram oral dose for pre-procedural bowel evacuation. However, the added phosphate in breastmilk is likely to be only about 130 mg over 24 hours in this situation. The increase from a typical dose of a rectal enema would be considerably less than this amount. Breastmilk sodium concentration is tightly regulated, and will not be affected. It is probably not necessary to suspend breastfeeding after the use of oral sodium phosphate solutions given once or twice for bowel evacuation before a procedure, but if there is concern, suspension of nursing for 24 hours after a dose should result in negligible increase in phosphate ingestion by the infant. Use of a phosphate rectal enema by a nursing mother would require no special precautions.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]


Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Gelsemium sempervirens root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

All parts of the false jasmine usually contain toxic alkaloids. Eating just one flower has reportedly been lethal to children. The plant can also cause skin allergies in some people and it is possible that the plant toxins can be absorbed through the skin, especially if there are cuts. Its not recommended to use false jasmine while breastfeeding. It is acceptable in homeopathic preparation.


Sodium phosphate, dibasic, heptahydrate and Breastfeeding

Safe


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.


What if I already have used Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Anxietin Anxiety Symptom Relief in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week