Question

I am a breastfeeding mother and i want to know if it is safe to use Etravirine? Is Etravirine safe for nursing mother and child? Does Etravirine extracts into breast milk? Does Etravirine has any long term or short term side effects on infants? Can Etravirine influence milk supply or can Etravirine decrease milk supply in lactating mothers?

Answer by DrLact: About Etravirine usage in lactation

In the United States and other developed countries, HIV-infected mothers should generally not breastfeed their infants. In countries in which no acceptable, feasible, sustainable and safe replacement feeding is available, World Health Organization guidelines recommend that all women with an HIV infection who are pregnant or breastfeeding should be maintained on antiretroviral therapy for at least the duration of risk for mother-to-child transmission. Mothers should exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first 6 months of life; breastfeeding with complementary feeding should continue through at least 12 months of life up to 24 months of life.[1] The first choice regimen for nursing mothers is tenofovir, efavirenz and either lamivudine or emtricitabine. If these drugs are unavailable, alternative regimens include: 1) zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz; 2) zidovudine, lamivudine and nevirapine; or 3) tenofovir, nevirapine and either lamivudine or emtricitabine. Exclusively breastfed infants should also receive 6 weeks of prophylaxis with nevirapine.[2][3] Etravirine is excreted in breastmilk in concentrations exceeding the maternal plasma HIV inhibitory concentration.

Alternate Drugs

Didanosine(Unsafe)
Abacavir(Safe)
Zidovudine(Low Risk)
Nevirapine(Low Risk)
Saquinavir(Unsafe)
Indinavir(Unsafe)
Nelfinavir(Unsafe)
Ritonavir(Unsafe)
Efavirenz(Unsafe)
Tenofovir(Safe)
Acyclovir(Safe)
Ertapenem(Safe)
Quinine(Safe)
Amantadine(Low Risk)
Cefprozil(Safe)
Aztreonam(Safe)
Naftifine(Safe)
Rifaximin(Safe)
Didanosine(Unsafe)
Malathion(Low Risk)
Ofloxacin(Safe)
Cefoxitin(Safe)
Gatifloxacin(Low Risk)
Cefotetan(Safe)
Abacavir(Safe)
Enoxacin(Low Risk)
Zidovudine(Low Risk)
Neomycin(Safe)
Nevirapine(Low Risk)
Doxycycline(Low Risk)
Valganciclovir(Low Risk)
Amikacin(Safe)
Nafcillin(Safe)
Primaquine(Low Risk)
Lindane(Unsafe)
Cefixime(Safe)
Saquinavir(Unsafe)
Demeclocycline(Low Risk)
Ganciclovir(Low Risk)
Moxifloxacin(Low Risk)
Atovaquone(Low Risk)
Cefepime(Safe)
Linezolid(Low Risk)
Indinavir(Unsafe)
Famciclovir(Low Risk)
Methicillin(Low Risk)
Nelfinavir(Unsafe)
Cefdinir(Safe)
Econazole(Safe)
Erythromycin(Low Risk)
Meropenem(Safe)
Cefazolin(Safe)
Clindamycin(Low Risk)
Ritonavir(Unsafe)
Lomefloxacin(Low Risk)
Cefaclor(Safe)
Efavirenz(Unsafe)
Tenofovir(Safe)
Levofloxacin(Low Risk)
Dapsone(Low Risk)
Kanamycin(Safe)
Capreomycin(Low Risk)
Didanosine(Unsafe)
Abacavir(Safe)
Zidovudine(Low Risk)
Nevirapine(Low Risk)
Saquinavir(Unsafe)
Nelfinavir(Unsafe)
Indinavir(Unsafe)
Ritonavir(Unsafe)
Efavirenz(Unsafe)
Tenofovir(Safe)
Sofosbuvir(Low Risk)
Amantadine(Low Risk)
Didanosine(Unsafe)
Ledipasvir(Low Risk)
Ombitasvir(Low Risk)
Abacavir(Safe)
Zidovudine(Low Risk)
Nevirapine(Low Risk)
Daclatasvir(Low Risk)
Valganciclovir(Low Risk)
Dasabuvir(Low Risk)
Saquinavir(Unsafe)
Ganciclovir(Low Risk)
Indinavir(Unsafe)
Nelfinavir(Unsafe)
Famciclovir(Low Risk)
Ribavirin(Low Risk)
Zanamivir(Safe)
Ritonavir(Unsafe)
Efavirenz(Unsafe)
Tenofovir(Safe)
Velpatasvir(Low Risk)
Simeprevir(Low Risk)
Acyclovir(Safe)
Abacavir(Safe)
Zidovudine(Low Risk)
Nevirapine(Low Risk)
Efavirenz(Unsafe)
Tenofovir(Safe)
Didanosine(Unsafe)
Disclaimer: Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. We do not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.