Question

I am a breastfeeding mother and i want to know if it is safe to use Cumin? Is Cumin safe for nursing mother and child? Does Cumin extracts into breast milk? Does Cumin has any long term or short term side effects on infants? Can Cumin influence milk supply or can Cumin decrease milk supply in lactating mothers?

Cumin lactation summary

Cumin is safe in breastfeeding
  • DrLact safety Score for Cumin is 1 out of 8 which is considered Safe as per our analyses.
  • A safety Score of 1 indicates that usage of Cumin is mostly safe during lactation for breastfed baby.
  • Our study of different scientific research also indicates that Cumin does not cause any serious side effects in breastfeeding mothers.
  • Most of scientific studies and research papers declaring usage of Cumin safe in breastfeeding are based on normal dosage and may not hold true for higher dosage.
  • Score calculated using the DrLact safety Version 1.2 model, this score ranges from 0 to 8 and measures overall safety of drug in lactation. Scores are primarily calculated using publicly available case studies, research papers, other scientific journals and publically available data.

Answer by Dr. Ru: About Cumin usage in lactation

Plant fruits are used. Attributed properties in traditional medicine are: carminative, digestive, antispasmodic, abortion inducer, galactagogue. Some properties are still under research: antimicrobial, antioxidant, antimutagenic, antidiabetic, diuretic, estrogenic and others. Toxicity in the usual use has not been shown. Medical indications according to the Commission E of the German Health Ministry: none. At latest update relevant published data related to breastfeeding was not found. It is a widely used plant as a spice and infusion beverage with therapeutic purposes for centuries, even while breastfeeding as galactagogue and treatment of colicky pain in infants. Because lack of toxicity at usual dosing a moderate consumption during breastfeeding would have a low or nil risk. Effectiveness of cumin as a galactagogue has not been stated. The best way to improve milk production is a frequent sucking and a proper technique. Precaution needed before taking plant infusions: 1. Make sure the reliability of source: toxicity has occurred after confusion with other one that was toxic, poisoning by containing heavy metals and food-borne poisoning due to contamination by bacteria and fungus. 2. Avoid excessive consumption. “Natural products” are not always good at whatever quantity. Plants contains biological active substances that have been the source of most of modern pharmacological drugs and may induce intoxication if consumed at high dose or long-term.

Answer by DrLact: About Cumin usage in lactation

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) seed contains a volatile oil that contains cuminaldehyde and other aldehydes; the seeds also contain numerous flavonoids and terpenes. Cumin has been used as a galactogogue in India;[1][2] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[3] No data exist on the excretion of any components of cumin into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of cumin in nursing mothers or infants. Cumin is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a spice and flavoring by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Cumin is generally well tolerated, but occasional phototoxic skin reactions have been reported after contact with the oil. Those allergic to cumin or related herbs should avoid cumin. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Cumin Possible Effects in Breastfeeding

Women who were between 14 and 90 days postpartum and reported lactation failure were given instructions on breastfeeding technique and encouraged to exclusively breastfeed. If their infant had gained less than 15 grams in 1 week, they were randomized to receive either two tablespoonfuls of a mixture containing wild asparagus or an identical placebo for 4 weeks. In each 100 grams, the mixture contained Asparagus racemosus 15 grams, Anethum soiva 1 gram, Ipomea digitata 1 gram, Glycyrrhiza glabra 1 gram, Spinacia oleracea 2.5 grams, Cuminum cyminum 0.5 gram, and Panchatrinamol 1 gram. Of the 64 women randomized, 11 did not complete the trial. Serum prolactin measurements were made before a morning nursing before treatment, and after 4 weeks of treatment. Infant weight gains and the number of supplemental feedings were recorded initially and after 4 weeks of therapy. No differences were found in the changes in serum prolactin, infant weight gain or amount of supplementation between the treatment and placebo groups after 4 weeks of therapy. No side effects or changes in liver function tests occurred during the study.[4] One hundred fifty-eight mothers in Iran of who reported difficulty in breastfeeding were given either a proprietary mixture of herbs (Shirafza Drop) or a chlorophyll solution as a placebo. The herbal mixture contained the purported galactogogues fennel, anise, cumin, black seed, and parsley. Infant ages ranged between 0 and 6 months and they were exclusively breastfed. Weight gain of the infants was measured over time. No difference in infant weight gain was seen between the two groups of infants.[5] Blinding and randomization in this study is unclear. In an uncontrolled, non-blinded multicenter study in India, 1132 patients who reported inadequate milk supply were give a mixture (Lactancia, Corona Remedies Pvt. Ltd.) To take in a dose of 30 grams twice daily. The product contains Asparagus racemosus (wild asparagus, shatavari), Cuminum cyminum (cumin), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Spinacia oleracea (spinach) as well as amino acids, vitamins, minerals and DHA. Most of the mothers (1049) had improved lactation and increased infant weight.[6] However, with no placebo control group, results cannot be attributed to the product.

Alternate Drugs

Fenugreek(Safe)
Coenzyme Q10(Low Risk)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Basil(Unsafe)
Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Castor(Unsafe)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Garlic(Safe)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Alfalfa(Unsafe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Melatonin(Safe)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Caraway(Safe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Chamomile(Safe)
Cumin(Safe)
Lecithin(Safe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Basil(Unsafe)
Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Castor(Unsafe)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Garlic(Safe)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Caraway(Safe)
Cumin(Safe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Chamomile(Safe)
Lecithin(Safe)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Castor(Unsafe)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Garlic(Safe)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Caraway(Safe)
Chamomile(Safe)
Cumin(Safe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Lecithin(Safe)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Basil(Unsafe)
Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Disclaimer: Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. We do not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.