Question

I am a breastfeeding mother and i want to know if it is safe to use Peanut? Is Peanut safe for nursing mother and child? Does Peanut extracts into breast milk? Does Peanut has any long term or short term side effects on infants? Can Peanut influence milk supply or can Peanut decrease milk supply in lactating mothers?

Answer by DrLact: About Peanut usage in lactation

Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) contain carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Some of the proteins in peanuts are considered to be allergens that can lead to allergic reactions. Cooked, unripe peanuts are reportedly used in Africa and Asia as a galactogogue;[1] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[2] Peanut protein allergens have been detected in breastmilk and some case reports and series have implicated maternal ingestion of peanuts during breastfeeding to peanut allergy in their breastfed infants.[3][4][5][6] Studies to determine whether maternal peanut ingestion during breastfeeding causes infant peanut allergy have come to conflicting conclusions. In the United States and United Kingdom, mothers were advised to avoid peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding in the late 1990s, but these recommendations have been withdrawn because of a lack of evidence of a reduction in peanut allergy.[7][8]

Peanut Side Effects in Breastfeeding

In a study on the infants of atopic parents, mothers were randomized either to standard infant feeding practices (n = 185) or to avoidance of peanuts and other food allergens during the third trimester of pregnancy and breastfeeding (n = 103). Testing at 12 months of age found a slightly reduced frequency of positive skin tests for peanut allergy in the avoidance group (n = 4) compared to the control group (n = 7), and no difference between the groups in the frequency of clinical allergy to peanuts.[10] In a case-control study, mothers of infants with peanut allergy (n = 202) or control infants (n = 201) were given a questionnaire to determine the extent of peanut ingestion during pregnancy and breastfeeding. No differences were noted in infant age, sex ratio, breastfeeding and several other variables. The mothers of peanut-allergic infants were 2.3 times more likely to have consumed peanuts during breastfeeding than mothers of the control infants, although peanut ingestion during pregnancy was a stronger predictor of peanut allergy.[11] In a cohort study, 503 infants with food allergies, but no reported peanut allergy, were tested for peanut allergy based on IgE antibody levels against peanuts. Although a correlation was found between maternal ingestion of peanuts during pregnancy and later infant peanut allergy, no correlation was found with maternal ingestion during breastfeeding.[12]

Alternate Drugs

Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Caraway(Safe)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Melatonin(Safe)
Coenzyme Q10(Low Risk)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Hops(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Cumin(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Garlic(Safe)
Lecithin(Safe)
Chamomile(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Basil(Unsafe)
Castor(Unsafe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Alfalfa(Unsafe)
Caraway(Safe)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Garlic(Safe)
Lecithin(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Basil(Unsafe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Alfalfa(Unsafe)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Somatropin(Low Risk)
Coriander(Safe)
Garlic(Safe)
Caraway(Safe)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Coriander(Safe)
Garlic(Safe)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Cumin(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Lecithin(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Basil(Unsafe)
Chamomile(Safe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Castor(Unsafe)
Caraway(Safe)
Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Licorice(Unsafe)
Aloe(Low Risk)
Fenugreek(Safe)
Hops(Low Risk)
Oregano(Low Risk)
Calendula(Safe)
Echinacea(Low Risk)
Nutmeg(Low Risk)
Rhubarb(Low Risk)
Ginger(Safe)
Coriander(Safe)
Garlic(Safe)
Ginkgo(Low Risk)
Cumin(Safe)
Sage(Low Risk)
Lecithin(Safe)
Cranberry(Safe)
Basil(Unsafe)
Chamomile(Safe)
Lavender(Low Risk)
Caraway(Safe)
Castor(Unsafe)
Chasteberry(Unsafe)
Dong Quai(Low Risk)
Disclaimer: Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. We do not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.