Multiple Miasm Breastfeeding

Modern medicine has evolved so much so that sooner or later every breastfeeding mother needs to take it in one form or other. Medication that is present in mothers blood will transfer into her breast milk to some extent. Most drugs do so at low levels and pose no real risk to infants but then there are some exceptions. In This post will discuss whether Multiple Miasm is safe in breast-feeding or not.

What is Multiple Miasm used for?


For temporary relief of symptoms related to miasmic conditions including skin rashes, itching, dry coughs, and warts.** **These statements are based upon homeopathic principles. They have not been reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Is Multiple Miasm usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Multiple Miasm safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Multiple Miasm. There is no credible study done on safety of Multiple Miasm while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Multiple Miasm as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Multiple Miasm Breastfeeding Analsys


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Lycopodium clavatum spore while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Aerial summits and spores of this fern are used. Traditionally use as a diuretic and intestinal spasm relief drug. Also used for abrasions and skin irritation. It may be a cause of asthma and contact dermatitis.

Aloe while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 8001-97-6

Herb leaves are used. It contains hydroxianthracenes, acemannan and glycomannan. Attributed properties: laxative and healing effect on wounds. Indication according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: constipation. Excessive or long-term use may lead to severe diarrhea, dehydration and liver toxicity. At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found.As an active laxative compound it can lead to colicky abdominal pain. Because excretion into breast milk is possible, avoiding it while breastfeeding is advisable. Non-toxic when topically used. Without proof of efficacy it is used to treat nipple's crackles or pain. If applied on the breast, cleanse it thoroughly before nursing to avoid swallowing by the infant. Risk of diarrhea or refusing to latch-on because of bad taste would increase.

Nitric acid while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7761-88-8

Avoid using it on the breast or cleanse thoroughly before nursing.

Silicon dioxide while Breastfeeding

Safe

A polymer made out of silicon-oxygen-methyl combination with a high molecular weight, water repellent and low superficial tension. It is used in many ways (dimethicone, simethicone, -see specific items)orally to treat infant colic and flatulence; as pediculicide, in cosmetic creams and lotions and skin protectants as to prevent ulcers and scars; arthroplasties, retinal detachments and reconstruction or cosmetic surgery as injections and implants. Silicone is widely distributed in our environment with several cosmetic and medicinal uses. No evidence of toxicity on human tissues has been shown. A 1994 report on immunological side effects in infants breastfed by mothers with silicone implants, was denied categorically by means of meta-analysis and other work. The absorption by oral or dermal route is negligible. Both a high molecular weight and polymer molecular structure make it practically impossible excretion in the milk and hence a significant amount of intestinal absorption by the infant. Those circumstances make silicone implants safe for lactation even if broken or manufacturing fault (Poly Implant Proth├Ęse, PIP). After extensive analysis of such silicone prosthesis, where lack of health risk was demonstrated, it can be concluded that many of the initial recommendations published lacked scientific validity, including that carriers of such prosthesis should not breastfeed. Silicon levels in blood and milk of women with implants (55 ng / ml) are similar to those of women without implants (51 ng / ml), 13 times lower than that found in cow's milk (709 ng / ml) and 80 times lower than in commercial infant formulas (4403 ng / ml). American Academy of Pediatrics: Product usually compatible with breastfeeding. To view other possible effects on breastfeeding of breast implant unrelated to silicone, see the term 'Augmentation Mammoplasty'. See below the information of these related products:


Multiple Miasm Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]

Sulfur while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7704-34-9

Sulfur 5% to 10% in a petrolatum base is safe for topical use in children, including infants under 2 months of age.[1] This makes it a useful alternative to organic insecticides for treating scabies in nursing mothers; however, the petrolatum base makes undesirable for use on the breast.

Aloe while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8001-97-6

Aloe vera gel consists of the clear gel from the center of fresh leaves of Aloe vera and related aloes. Active ingredients include mono- and polysaccharides (e.g., acemannan, glucomannan), allantoin, enzymes (e.g., cyclooxygenase, amylase, lipase, alkaline phosphatase, carboxypeptidase), and salicylic acid. It should not be confused with Aloe latex which comes from the inner portion of the skin and contains potent anthraquinone laxatives. Aloe vera gel has been used topically on the nipples during nursing to help heal cracked nipples. In a randomized, single-blinded study (investigators blinded), aloe vera was more effective than lanolin in decreasing nipple pain score after 7 days in women with sore nipples postpartum.[1] Another study compared breastmilk alone applied to the nipples after breastfeeding to either olive oil or aloe vera gel. All had less pain after 7 days of nursing, but the decrease on pain was greater with aloe vera than with the other treatments.[2] Topical aloe has also been combined with a cactus leaf preparation and massage to treat engorgement.[3] If aloe vera is applied to the nipples, it should be washed off before nursing the infant because the taste might adversely affect nursing or cause diarrhea in the infant.[4][5] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of Aloe vera gel in nursing mothers or infants. Aloe vera gel has caused itching, burning, and allergic contact dermatitis, possibly from contamination with the irritating latex from the leaves.[6][7] Aloe vera gel also has an antiplatelet effect and can enhance the antiplatelet effect of other drugs. Aloe latex, the laxative, should not be used during breastfeeding.[8][9] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.


Multiple Miasm Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Sulfur and Breastfeeding

Safe

Note: Study and data for tropical use only

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.

Thuja occidentalis leaf and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Thuja is one of the most common remedies used for warts. Topical Usage of Thuja for wart is likely safe while breastfeeding. We do not have sufficient safety usage data for Thuja oral consumption, However its likely unsafe to use thuja orally while breastfeeding.

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.


I am nursing mother and I have already used Multiple Miasm, what should I do?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Multiple Miasm is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Multiple Miasm, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Multiple Miasm has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Multiple Miasm, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Multiple Miasm in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week