Asp Breastfeeding

It is recommended to breastfeed exclusively for six months and then while introducing to other food sources extend it to twelve months. In this duration most mothers will need help of some sort of medication, It could be for short term like could and flue or it could be something chronic like Arthritis or Diabetes and here comes the question of safety of medication in use. In this post we will figure out what is Asp and whether its safe to use Asp while nursing or not.

What is Asp used for?


For temporary relief of symptoms of cough with expectoration and dyspepsia, ill effects of melons, water and dried fruits, thick yellow ropy mucous secretions.

Is Asp usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Asp safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Asp. There is no credible study done on safety of Asp while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Asp as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Asp Breastfeeding Analsys


Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Colchicum autumnale bulb while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 64-86-8

It is used for treatment of Gout, Familial Mediterranean Fever. As well as for other conditions like Amyloidosis, Behçet's Syndrome, Pericarditis, Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Pyoderma gangrenosum. It is excreted in breast milk in quantities that differ according to different published studies, from no clinically significant in some, until being important in others, but there have been no problems in infants whose mothers were treated, even after months, with undetectable plasma levels in these infants. The concomitant use of macrolide antibiotics and fruit juices (both the mother and the infant) , especially grape-fruit, is not recommended since they may interfere with bile excretion and greatly increase toxicity. The American Academy of Breastfeeding rates it as compatible with breastfeeding. List of Essential Medicines of WHO (2002): compatible with breastfeeding

Sodium sulfate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7727-73-3

Osmotic laxatives are often used to cleanse the bowel before medical procedures.They base their action on the very little or nothing they are absorbed and by this means forcing the water to enter the intestine with the result of watery diarrhea. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. Another laxative with similar estructure which is Sodium Picosulfate (see specific info) is not excreted into breast milk Be aware of drinking enough fluids to avoid dehydration of the nursing mother who is already loosing water by producing about 1 liter of milk a day.

Silicon dioxide while Breastfeeding

Safe

A polymer made out of silicon-oxygen-methyl combination with a high molecular weight, water repellent and low superficial tension. It is used in many ways (dimethicone, simethicone, -see specific items)orally to treat infant colic and flatulence; as pediculicide, in cosmetic creams and lotions and skin protectants as to prevent ulcers and scars; arthroplasties, retinal detachments and reconstruction or cosmetic surgery as injections and implants. Silicone is widely distributed in our environment with several cosmetic and medicinal uses. No evidence of toxicity on human tissues has been shown. A 1994 report on immunological side effects in infants breastfed by mothers with silicone implants, was denied categorically by means of meta-analysis and other work. The absorption by oral or dermal route is negligible. Both a high molecular weight and polymer molecular structure make it practically impossible excretion in the milk and hence a significant amount of intestinal absorption by the infant. Those circumstances make silicone implants safe for lactation even if broken or manufacturing fault (Poly Implant Prothèse, PIP). After extensive analysis of such silicone prosthesis, where lack of health risk was demonstrated, it can be concluded that many of the initial recommendations published lacked scientific validity, including that carriers of such prosthesis should not breastfeed. Silicon levels in blood and milk of women with implants (55 ng / ml) are similar to those of women without implants (51 ng / ml), 13 times lower than that found in cow's milk (709 ng / ml) and 80 times lower than in commercial infant formulas (4403 ng / ml). American Academy of Pediatrics: Product usually compatible with breastfeeding. To view other possible effects on breastfeeding of breast implant unrelated to silicone, see the term 'Augmentation Mammoplasty'. See below the information of these related products:


Asp Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Echinacea angustifolia while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84696-11-7; 90028-20

Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida) contain high molecular weight polysaccharides (e.g., heteroxylan, arabinogalactan) and lower molecular weight compounds (e.g., alkylamides, caffeoyl conjugates such as cichoric acid and echinacosides), but no single chemical is known to be responsible for echinacea's biological activity. Some products have been standardized based on echinacoside, and others on cichoric acid. Echinacea has no specific uses during breastfeeding, but is commonly used orally to treat or prevent upper respiratory infections. It is also used topically to treat skin infections. Excretion of some of the purportedly active alkamides was found in breastmilk in one mother. No data exist on the safety and efficacy of echinacea in nursing mothers or infants. In general, echinacea is well tolerated with gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and constipation, skin rash and rarely allergic reactions reported. It may also alter the metabolism of some dugs metabolized by the P450 enzyme system. Some sources indicate that echinacea is safe in recommended doses,[1] while others recommend avoiding it during breastfeeding because of the lack of published safety data. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Goldenseal while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84603-60-1

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) root contains berberine and other isoquinoline alkaloids. Goldenseal has traditionally been used as an anti-infective both systemically and topically, although high-quality studies of its efficacy and safety are lacking. It has also been used to mask illicit drugs in the urine, although it appears to be ineffective with modern laboratory methods. Goldenseal has been used topically by nursing mothers to treat sore nipples.[1] No data exist on the excretion of any components of goldenseal into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of goldenseal in nursing mothers. Berberine can displace bilirubin from serum albumin, causing concern about exposure of newborn infants, because bilirubin can build up in the infant's brain, causing brain damage. However, the extent of berberine's passage from the mother to the infant is unknown. Most sources recommend avoiding exposure of neonates to goldenseal via breastfeeding or otherwise.[2][3][4] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]

Colchicum autumnale bulb while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 64-86-8

Long-term prophylactic maternal doses of colchicine up to 1.5 mg daily produce levels in milk that result in the infant receiving less than 10% of the maternal weight-adjusted dosage. The highest milk levels occur 2 to 4 hours after a dose, so avoiding breastfeeding during this time can minimize the infant dose, although some clinicians simply recommend taking the drug after nursing. No adverse effects in breastfed infants have been reported in case series and a case-control study and some authors consider colchicine safe during breastfeeding in women being treated for familial Mediterranean fever or rheumatic conditions.[1][2][3][4]

Pulsatilla vulgaris while Breastfeeding



Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla and other related species) contains ranunculin, protoanemonin, and anemonin as well as triterpene saponins and flavonoids. The fresh plant is extremely irritating to the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous membranes. Allergic reactions have been reported to pulsatilla. Homeopathic preparations of pulsatilla are reportedly used for sore nipples and mastitis,[1] to reduce an overabundant milk supply,[2] or to increase milk supply.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No scientifically valid clinical trials support either of these uses. Because of a lack of information, other agents may be preferred in nursing mothers. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed


Asp Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Goldenseal and Breastfeeding

Unsafe


Ledum palustre twig and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Labrador tea is a plant. The leaves and flowering shoots are used to make medicine. People take Labrador tea for sore throat, chest congestion, coughs, lung infections, and other chest ailments. They also take it for diarrhea, kidney problems, joint and muscle pain (rheumatism), headache, and cancer.

Women use it to cause an abortion or treat female disorders.Some people add Labrador tea to bath water or apply it directly to the skin to treat skin problems. The flowers and leaves of the plant are used to prepare tea. However, frequent intake of the same have some side effects like headaches, indigestion, cramps, and vomiting.

Labrador tea has narcotic properties. If taken in concentrations that are too high, it can cause symptoms of intoxication that can lead to paralysis and death. Due to its narcotic properties Its likely unsafe to use Labrador tea if you are breastfeeding. If you are pregnant It might cause an abortion.


Pulsatilla vulgaris and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Note: Mostly safe in Homeopathic preparations


Sepia officinalis juice and Breastfeeding

Safe

SEPIA OFFICINALIS is usually low in mercury and its likely safe in breastfeeding.



What if I already have used Asp?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Asp is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Asp, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Asp has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Asp, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Asp in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week