Headache - Migraine Breastfeeding
Modern medicine has evolved so much so that sooner or later every breastfeeding mother needs to take it in one form or other. Medication that is present in mothers blood will transfer into her breast milk to some extent. Most drugs do so at low levels and pose no real risk to infants but then there are some exceptions. In This post will discuss whether Headache - Migraine is safe in breast-feeding or not.

What is Headache - Migraine used for?


SECTION HEADACHE - MIGRAINE Formulated for associated symptoms such as throbbing pain, pressure, congestion, dizziness, nausea and light sensitivity.

Is Headache - Migraine usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Headache - Migraine safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Headache - Migraine. There is no credible study done on safety of Headache - Migraine while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Headache - Migraine as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Headache - Migraine Breastfeeding Analsys


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Atropa belladonna while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 8007-93-0

In herbal medicine the leaves of this plant that contains numerous alkaloids are used: l-hyoscyamine and atropine, scopolamine or hyoscine and, all of them potentially high toxic.Traditionally used with poor clinical evidence based on trials as anti-asthmatic, for common colds and intestinal spasms. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. With anticholinergic and antimuscarinic properties that may reduce milk production: if necessary take as low dose as possible and avoid long-term treatment if decreasing milk production is observed.Serious side effects (tachycardia, thirst, fever, mydriasis, seizures, coma), especially in infants and newborns (Caksen 2003 Laffargue 2011, Glatstein 2014, Rodríguez-González 2014).There have been cases of gangrene when applied to the chest (Wani 2011). Belladonna may be included in association with other “over the counter" medications of doubtful effectiveness or safety. Overall drug associations are not recommended. Cautions when taking herbal teas:1. Make sure it is obtained from a reliable source: reportedly, poisonings have occurred due to confusion after using another plant with toxic effects (Hsu 1995), some others contain heavy metals that may cause poisoning and others may cause food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi.2. Do not take it excessively. "Natural" products are not always good in any amount: plants contain active substances from which are made many compounds of our traditional pharmacopoeia that can cause poisoning if consumed in exaggerated quantities or for long periods.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Black cohosh while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Rizomes and roots are used. It contains saponids, phytoestrogens, and other substances. Attributed effect: estrogenic stimulation. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: pre-menstrual dysmenorrhea, menopause. Maximal daily dose: 40 mg of drug equivalent. Do not use it for longer than 6 months Estrogen-agonist may decrease breast milk production and alter its composition.

Arabica coffee bean while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84650-00-0

Infant intake after usual daily consumption of the mother is lower than usual recommended dose for neonatal apnea treatment. Elimination-time period may last from few hours in adults, to 3-4 days in the newborn infant. At higher dose (more than 300 mg per day) caffeine may induce irritability, tremor and insomnia in the infant. However, some infants may develop irritability at a lower dose; in those cases the mother should decide appropriate coffee intake. Some studies have failed to show harmful effect among infants whose mothers were strong coffee consumers even during pregnancy. Daily intake as high as 1 liter or more has been associated to anemia and iron deficiency in mothers and breastfed infants. Also, has been related to the Raynaud's phenomenon in the nipple of nursing women. Mean Caffeine content: 1 coffee cup: 100 mg, 1 black tea cup: 80 mg, 1 green tea cup: 50 mg, 1 liter of cola & soda and energizers beverages 100 to 340 mg. See also Caffeine as medication. The American Academy of Pediatrics rates it compatible with breastfeeding.

Nitroglycerin while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 55-63-0

Vasodilator used to treat cardiac disorders like ischemia and mainly anal fissures.It is also used during pregnancy as a tocolytic drug in cases of threatened preterm labor and eclampsia.It has been used to treat heart disorders in babies and children. Even to treat anal fissures in children under 1 year, and noteworthy, in ischemic issues on premature infants without side effects.It is administered intravenously, orally, sublingually, on skin patches, ointment ... Because of a moderately-high volume of distribution and very fast metabolism (Tmax and t1 / 2 minutes) it is highly unlikely the passage of significant amounts to the breast milk, especially when applied topically. This explains why it has not been observed any troubles in 40 infants whose mothers with anal fissures were treated with nitroglycerin ointment application even for periods of 12 months. Mothers have complained of headaches that commonly occur with the use of various vasodilators drugs. The amount of nitrate / nitrite in this type of vasodilator drugs is of few milligrams, therefore, toxicity associated to nitrates such as methemoglobinemia in breastfed infants from treated mothers has not been reported (The dose of nitrite is Rectogesic 1.5 mg / 12 hours).

Strychnos ignatii seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Mercury while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 7439-97-6

Environmental pollutant that is used for manufacturation of batteries, fungicidal products, dental amalgam, and contaminated fish. Most of mercury present in breast milk does it as an inorganic substance which is almost non-absorbable. Breastfeeding should be discontinued whenever a mother is contaminated or intoxicated. It may be a source of neurological troubles. Benefits of breastfeeding are largely more important than risk related to the presence of mild level environment pollutants in human milk, in many instances, they are at lower content than those found in cow’s milk or other foods. (Codex alimentarius FAO-WHO).

Strychnos nux-vomica seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Claviceps purpurea sclerotium while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 84775-56-4

A parasitic fungus from the ear of some cereals, particularly rye, which since ancient times has caused epidemics of a serious disease, ergotism (Florea 2017, Belser 2013, Lee 2009). It has a complex composition, highlighting the ergoline alkaloids: lysergic acid amides such as ergometrine and ergopeptines such as ergotamine and ergotoxine (Florea 2017, Hulvová 2013) that act on adrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors. Since the last update, we have not found published data on its excretion in breast milk. Ergot alkaloids have oxytocic, vasoconstrictive and lactation-inhibiting effects by inhibiting prolactin, among many others (Florea 2017, Hulvová 2013, Lee 2010, Lee 2009). Indications from the German Ministry of Health’s Commission E: none. Due to its serious adverse reactions and toxicity, natural alkaloids are not used in therapy, and there are recommendations for their withdrawal from sale (EMA 2014). At present, semisynthetic derivatives such as methylergometrine, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergocristine, bromocriptine and lisuride are used, among others. See below the information of these related products:

Hypericum perforatum while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 68917-49-7

Herb commonly used from ancient times. Firm evidence is available on its effectiveness for treatment of depression, to the extent that it should be avoided a sudden stop of medication to prevent a rebound effect. It has been also topically used for the treatment of wounds, burns and eczema due to healing and antiseptical properties. Constituents are: Hypericin, Hyperforin and Quercetin. Antidepressant properties are attributed to Hypericin but mostly to Hyperforin. Quercetin is a flavonoid which is commonly found in many fruits and eatable vegetables. Hyperforin is excreted into breast milk in nil or clinically non-significant amount with not side-effects reported among breastfed infants from treated mothers, except for isolated and dubious cases of somnolence and colicky pain with spontaneous resolution with no medical intervention being required. Plasma levels in those infants were undetectable or close to the lower detectable point (0.1μg/L). Hypericin has not been detected in the breast milk. Quercetin levels found were as low as of few nanomols/L., and related to composition of fruits and vegetables of diet. It is most important to make sure that composition and amount of Hypericum contained in commercially available products is correct, do not take it without medical surveillance, avoid sudden stop and consider pharmacological interactions with many other medications.


Headache - Migraine Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]

Atropa belladonna while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8007-93-0

Belladonna (Atropa belladonna) contains anticholinergic alkaloids such as atropine and scopolamine. Belladonna has been used in the past for headache, airway obstruction, and irritable bowel syndrome among others, but its use has been supplanted by more specific and less toxic compounds. Long-term use of belladonna might reduce milk production by reducing serum prolactin.[1] Application of belladonna paste to the nipple to reduce milk secretion during lactation is an extremely old use.[2] However, it is still used this way in rural India for treating breast abscesses and may have contributed to cases of breast gangrene.[3] Because of the narrow therapeutic index and variable potency of plant-based (i.e., nonstandardized) belladonna, it should be avoided orally and topically during lactation. Homeopathic products are not likely to interfere with breastfeeding or cause toxicity. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Black cohosh while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84776-26-1

Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa, formerly Actaea racemosa) root was thought to have mild estrogenic activity based on its triterpene content, which is standardized based on 27-deoxyactein. However, recent studies have found no estrogenic activity.[1][2] It is primarily used for postmenopausal symptoms and has been used to promote labor.[3][4][5][6][7][8] Currently, it has no specific uses during breastfeeding, although historically it was supposedly used by native American women as a galactogogue.[9] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of black cohosh in nursing mothers or infants. In general, there is a low frequency of adverse reactions, but dizziness, nausea, headache, rash, vomiting, and rarely, hepatitis and allergic reactions have been reported.[3][10][11] Some sources recommend against its use during breastfeeding because of the lack of safety data and its potential estrogenic activity,[10] while others do not contraindicate its use.[9] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Nitroglycerin while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 55-63-0

Topical use of nitroglycerin for anal fissures by nursing mothers appears to have no adverse effects on their breastfed infants. Topical use on the nipples has been used for alleviation of Raynaud phenomenon of the nipples, but only after cessation of breastfeeding.[1] Nitroglycerin should not be used topically on the nipples during breastfeeding. Sublingual and intravenous nitroglycerin have not been studied during breastfeeding. Observe infants for flushing and discomfort after breastfeeding.


Headache - Migraine Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Gelsemium sempervirens root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

All parts of the false jasmine usually contain toxic alkaloids. Eating just one flower has reportedly been lethal to children. The plant can also cause skin allergies in some people and it is possible that the plant toxins can be absorbed through the skin, especially if there are cuts. Its not recommended to use false jasmine while breastfeeding. It is acceptable in homeopathic preparation.


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.


Thuja occidentalis leafy twig and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Thuja is one of the most common remedies used for warts. Topical Usage of Thuja for wart is likely safe while breastfeeding. We do not have sufficient safety usage data for Thuja oral consumption, However its likely unsafe to use thuja orally while breastfeeding.

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.


I am nursing mother and I have already used Headache - Migraine, what should I do?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Headache - Migraine is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Headache - Migraine, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Headache - Migraine has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Headache - Migraine, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Headache - Migraine in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week