Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G Breastfeeding
Breast milk is superior in nutrition, It provides resistance against infections and allergies, It is naturally sterile. Despite all the advantages of breastfeeding some mothers choose to pause the breastfeeding in fear of harmful effects of medicines passing in breast milk. Are you wondering about breastfeeding and using Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G ? Know what is Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G and how it can affect your breast milk and whether Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G is safe for your kid or not.

What is Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G used for?


SECTION Bowel - Digestive Care Formulated for digestive health and for associated symptoms such as weak digestion, burning, bloating, nausea, cramping and pressure.

Purpose: OTC - PURPOSE SECTION Formulated for digestive health and for associated symptoms such as weak digestion, burning, bloating, nausea, cramping and pressure.

I am breastfeeding mother and I am using Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G. Can it have any bad effect on my kid? Shall I search for better alternative?

Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G. There is no credible study done on safety of Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G Breastfeeding Analsys


Bismuth while Breastfeeding

Safe

Bismuth salts are used alone or together with other components in preparations against gastritis and diarrhea.Bismuth salicylate contains about 60% bismuth and 40% salicylate. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. Bismuth is not absorbed into the systemic circulation of the mother. There may be a risk of absorption of salicylate in the case of bismuth salicylate, although in small quantity (<1% of the maternal dose), but no cases of Reye's syndrome have been reported after taking bismuth salicylate or other non-acetylated salicylate compounds. Due to the otherwise minimum risk of Reye's syndrome and the indiscriminate use of bismuth subsalicylate for treatment of gastroenteritis cannot be justifiable since most of gastroenteritis do not require medication instead a simply adequate hydration, a safer alternative should be desirable while breastfeeding, like the other salts of bismuth (citrate, etc).

Silver nitrate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7761-88-8

Avoid using it on the breast or cleanse thoroughly before nursing.

Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

Used in the treatment of promyelocitic leukemia in adults.

Bryonia alba root while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Climbing plant. The female inflorescences or flower tips are used.It contains phloroglucinols, estrogenic, quercetin, kaempferol, tannins, phenolic acids essential oil and flavonoids. One of its components, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is the most powerful phytoestrogen known. Properties that are attributed: hypnotic, sedative, orexigenic.It is used as a flavoring and stabilizer of the beer.Indications German Commission E Ministry of Health, EMA and ESCOP: insomnia, nervousness, anxiety There is no scientific evidence showing an improvement in milk production.A possible estrogenic effect may be a decrease in milk production.The best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding along with proper technique. During breastfeeding its consumption should be moderate or occasional.

Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 520-36-5

It is a widely used plant even in infants. Because of lack of toxicity, a moderate use is considered to be safe. If topically used, do not apply it on the nipple because risk of contact dermatitis has been reported. There are two different species with similar properties: 1) Common or Sweet Chamomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita). 2) Roman, English or Bitter Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis o Chamaemelum nobile). Inflorescence of the herb is used. Contains Essential Oil, Flavonoids, Lactones and Tannins. Unproven properties are: Anti-spasmodic. Digestive, Anti-inflammatory, Sedative.

Cinchona officinalis bark while Breastfeeding

Safe

Cinchona alkaloid used in the prophylaxis and treatment of malaria (Pérez 2009). Administered orally or intravenously. It is excreted in breast milk in clinically insignificant amounts (Mathew 2004, Phillips 1986, Terwilliger 1934), much lower than the dose used in newborns and infants (Fulton 1992).No problems have been observed in infants whose mothers were taking it (FDA 2008, Terwilliger 1934). Its use is authorized in infants and children.Avoid in cases of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (Mathew 2004, WHO/UNICEF 2002, Fulton 1992). American Academy of Pediatrics: medication usually compatible with breastfeeding (AAP 2001). WHO list of essential medicines: compatible with breastfeeding (WHO / UNICEF, 2002).

Potassium dichromate while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 7778-50-9

Así como el Cromo (véase ficha) en estado trivalente (3+) y a dosis apropiadas carece de toxicidad y constituye un oligoelemento nutricional esencial, las sales hexavalentes (6+) de cromo tienen usos industriales (cromado), son oxidantes, corrosivas, irritantes, están catalogadas como carcinogenos 1A y mutágenos 1B (INSHT 2012, ATSDR 2012), pueden causar dermatitis de contacto y toxicidad crónica y aguda grave.El cromo 6+ se encuentra también en el humo de combustión del tabaco, en cosméticos (Hepp 2014) y en algunas prótesis osteoarticulares (Oppermann 2015). Los compuestos de cromo exavalente, por su peligrosidad, no tienen actualmente usos médicos. A nivel de riesgo laboral para la madre lactante, las frases (INSHT 2008) de riesgo (antiguas frases R, actualmente frases H de Hazard, peligro) o de prudencia (frases P) que deben aparecer en la ficha de seguridad de un producto son sólo dos:- H362 (ant. R64): "Puede perjudicar a los niños alimentados con leche materna"- P263: "Evitar el contacto durante el embarazo y la lactancia"Otras tres frases que se deben considerar durante la lactancia tienen relación con el poder cancerígeno, mutagénico o acumulativo de un producto:- H351 (ant. R40): "Posibles efectos cancerígenos" - H371 (ant. R68): "Posibilidad de efectos irreversibles" - H373 (ant. R33): "Peligro de efectos acumulativos" Basándose en la ausencia de estas frases en las fichas de seguridad del trióxido de cromo (Panreac 2012, INSHT 2005), no sería preciso apartar a la madre lactante de su puesto de trabajo, bastándole a la empresa con cumplir las exigencias legales de valores máximos de exposición ambiental y a la trabajadora las normas aconsejadas de prudencia (guantes, lavado de manos, cambio de ropa, etc. (Panreac 2012). Pero según la normativa europea vigente (Reglamento CE 2008) cuando un producto es carcinógeno y mutágeno, las madres lactantes trabajadoras no deben estar expuestas a mezclas, sean de sólidos, líquidos o gases, con límites de concentración superiores a 0,3%.Además resulta un anomalía el que estando clasificado como cancerígeno 1A, no se le aplique la frase H351 (R40). A la luz de toda la bibliografía, consideramos que la madre lactante no debería estar expuesta a compuestos hexavalentes de cromo en el ambiente laboral.

Lycopodium clavatum spore while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Aerial summits and spores of this fern are used. Traditionally use as a diuretic and intestinal spasm relief drug. Also used for abrasions and skin irritation. It may be a cause of asthma and contact dermatitis.

Magnesium carbonate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 546-93-0

Ingested Magnesium does not concentrate into breast milk. Naturally occurring, the mean Magnesium concentration in the milk is 31 mg/L (range 15 – 64 mg/L) and not affected by the ingestion of Magnesium. Because of a low oral bioavailability the pass from the breast milk toward the infant's plasma is hampered, except in premature and newborn infants who may exhibit a higher intestinal absorption due to an increased permeability. Avoid chronic or excessive use. WHO Model List of Essential Medicines 2002: Magnesium carbonate is compatible with breastfeeding.

Strychnos nux-vomica seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Radish while Breastfeeding

Safe

We are working on a comment for this product.

Tobacco leaf while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 8037-19-2

Mother’s tobacco addiction increases the risk of not initiating breastfeeding or early weaning. The milk of smoking mothers contains higher levels of Cotinine, Cadmium, Mercury other heavy metal, lower amount of proteins, Vitamin A C and E and other antioxidants. Smoking may decrease milk production and induce alteration of lipid pattern of human milk. There is a higher risk of future obesity and lower stature among breastfed siblings of smoking mothers. The risk for Sudden Infant Death is also increased. A major health problem among infants who have been raised into a tobacco polluted environment is that they are more prone to suffer of respiratory tract infections, asthma and more frequent hospital admissions for this reason. Not because of Nicotine excreted into the mother’s milk but because of the inhalation of smoke particles originated from combustion of tobacco, which are suspended in the air. However, all this risk increases if in addition to mother smoking, the infant is formula fed. The latter is a reason to support breastfeeding among mothers who are not able to stop smoking since it is more effective whether the mother decreases smoking and avoids doing so inside the house. Most important, however, is that the mother would continue breastfeeding the baby. Nicotine excretion into milk is decreased if the mother feeds the infant 2 hours after smoking. Health promotion campaigns against tobacco addiction should be focused on non-breastfeeding moms. Breastfeeding should be regarded as a unique opportunity to enhance good health practices as to quitting from an unhealthy habit as smoking which is harmful for mother’s health and other next people. Bed-sharing is not recommended for mothers who smoke.

Ginger while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 84696-15-1

The root of this herb is used.It contains oleoresin and essential oil along with sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and spicy substances (gingeroles and shogaols).Attributed properties: digestive, carminative, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory.Indications according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: motion sickness, vomiting (pregnancy, post surgery), anorexia, dyspepsia. Plant widely used in many countries as a condiment and as a medicine. In some cultures its consumption increases during pregnancy or lactation without reported complications (Nordeng 2004, Chen 2013, Kennedy 2013). It is used as a galactogogue by cultures from several continents (Raven 2007, Lamxay 2011, Sim 2103). A study with few participants shown an increase of milk production within the first 6 days postpartum but not later; there was no change on prolactin levels (Paritakul 2016). The best galactogogue result is achieved by a frequent on demand suckling and using a correct technique (ABM Protocol No. 9 2011). It may be considered compatible with breastfeeding (Dennehy 2011)Abuse may be a cause of clotting issues (bleeding) and heartburn.

Echinacea, unspecified while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84696-11-7

Plant that is widely used even during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Because a lack of toxicity with an appropriate dose and moderate consumption it should be compatible with breastfeeding. The roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids among others. Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications are: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions.Roots and aerial summits are used. It contains polysaccharides, essential oil, flavonoids, pyrrolizidine alkaloids ... Unproven effects: immune stimulant, wound healing, anti-inflammatory. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: common cold, bronchitis, skin lesions. Contrary to the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP), the European Medication Agency does not recommend usage in younger than 12 years (allergy risk). Avoid using for longer than 8 weeks (risk for leukopenia)


Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Arsenic trioxide while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 1327-53-3

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy. It might be possible to breastfeed safely during intermittent therapy with an appropriate period of breastfeeding abstinence; the manufacturer recommends an abstinence period of 1 week after the last dose. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[1] Women who receive chemotherapy during pregnancy are more likely to have difficulty nursing their infant.[2]

Matricaria recutita while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8002-66-2

Two different plant species with similar effects are known as chamomile: German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Both contain similar ingredients, including sesquiterpenes (e.g., bisabolol, farnesene), sesquiterpenelactones (e.g., chamazulene, matricin), flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin), and volatile oils. Chamomile is used orally as a sedative and for gastrointestinal conditions; it is used topically for wound healing. Both herbal and homeopathic preparations have been used to treat mastitis and cracked, bleeding nipples.[1] Chamomile has been used as a galactogogue;[2][3] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] Chamomile is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) for use in food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a spice, seasoning, or flavoring agent. No data exist on the safety of chamomile in nursing mothers or infants, although rare sensitization may occur (see below).[5] It has been safely and effectively used alone and with other herbs in infants for the treatment of colic, diarrhea, and other conditions,[6][7][8][9] so the smaller amounts expected (but not demonstrated) in breastmilk are likely not to be harmful with usual maternal doses. Note Clostridium botulinum (botulism) spores have been found in some loose-leaf chamomile teas sold in health food stores. Topical chamomile is a known sensitizing agent, even with homeopathic products.[10] Two women developed contact dermatitis of the nipples and areolas after applying Kamillosan ointment for cracked nipples. The product was purchased in England and contained 10.5% Roman chamomile extracts and oil. Reactions were confirmed to be caused by Roman chamomile by patch testing in both women. Drinking chamomile tea can exacerbate topical skin rashes and has caused anaphylaxis in sensitized individuals.[11] Chamomile has possible cross-reactivity with other members of the aster family (e.g., echinacea, feverfew, and milk thistle).[5] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Cinchona officinalis bark while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 130-95-0

Because of the low levels of quinine in breastmilk, amounts ingested by the infant are small and would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants. The dosage in milk is far below those required to treat an infant for malaria.[1] However, quinine should not be used in mothers with an infant who is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient.[2] Even the relatively small amounts of quinine in tonic water ingested by the mother have caused hemolysis in G6PD-deficient infants.

Pulsatilla vulgaris while Breastfeeding



Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla and other related species) contains ranunculin, protoanemonin, and anemonin as well as triterpene saponins and flavonoids. The fresh plant is extremely irritating to the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous membranes. Allergic reactions have been reported to pulsatilla. Homeopathic preparations of pulsatilla are reportedly used for sore nipples and mastitis,[1] to reduce an overabundant milk supply,[2] or to increase milk supply.[3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] No scientifically valid clinical trials support either of these uses. Because of a lack of information, other agents may be preferred in nursing mothers. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed

Ginger while Breastfeeding



Ginger (Zingiber officinale) root contains the pungent principles or gingerols that are considered to be responsible for its pharmacological activity. Ginger is commonly used for nausea and motion sickness. It has no specific lactation-related uses in Western medicine, but is reportedly used as a galactogogue in some parts of Asia.[1] A randomized study in Thailand found that milk production was higher on day 3 but not on day 7 with ginger compared to placebo twice daily.[2] In Thailand it is reportedly used as part of a topical herbal mixture to shorten the time to full lactation and also part of a topical herbal mixture used for breast engorgement.[3][4] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[5] Very limited data exist on the safety and efficacy of ginger in nursing mothers or infants. However, ginger has a long history of use as a food and medicine and is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food flavoring by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, including during lactation.[6] When used as a medicinal, ginger is generally well tolerated in adults, but mild gastrointestinal side effects such as bad taste, heartburn and abdominal discomfort, are reported occasionally. In Thailand it is used as part of a topical herbal mixture to shorten the time to full lactation.[3] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Echinacea, unspecified while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84696-11-7; 90028-20

Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida) contain high molecular weight polysaccharides (e.g., heteroxylan, arabinogalactan) and lower molecular weight compounds (e.g., alkylamides, caffeoyl conjugates such as cichoric acid and echinacosides), but no single chemical is known to be responsible for echinacea's biological activity. Some products have been standardized based on echinacoside, and others on cichoric acid. Echinacea has no specific uses during breastfeeding, but is commonly used orally to treat or prevent upper respiratory infections. It is also used topically to treat skin infections. Excretion of some of the purportedly active alkamides was found in breastmilk in one mother. No data exist on the safety and efficacy of echinacea in nursing mothers or infants. In general, echinacea is well tolerated with gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and constipation, skin rash and rarely allergic reactions reported. It may also alter the metabolism of some dugs metabolized by the P450 enzyme system. Some sources indicate that echinacea is safe in recommended doses,[1] while others recommend avoiding it during breastfeeding because of the lack of published safety data. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.


Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Baptisia tinctoria and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Wild indigo is an herb. The root is used to make medicine.Wild indigo is used for infections such as diphtheria, influenza (flu), swine flu, the common cold and other upper respiratory tract infections, lymph node infections, scarlet fever, malaria, and typhoid. It is also used for sore tonsils (tonsillitis), sore throat, swelling of the mouth and throat, fever, boils, and Crohns disease. Some people apply wild indigo directly to the skin for ulcers, sore and painful nipples, as a douche for vaginal discharge, and for cleaning open and swollen wounds. Wild indigo is UNSAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin, long-term or in large doses. Large doses can cause vomiting, diarrhea, other intestinal problems, and spasms.

While breastfeeding wild indigo is likely not safe when taken by mouth or applied to the skin. Avoid use.


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Pulsatilla vulgaris and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Note: Mostly safe in Homeopathic preparations


Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.



What if I already have used Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Bowel - Digestive Care 56.7 G in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week