Natural Fit Breastfeeding

Do you know that important immune protective proteins are present in breast milk? Breast milk also contains required vitamins, minerals, saturated and un saturated fats. These things are extremely important for development of healthy brain. If you are taking any medicine for short term or for the chronic reason then that passes in breast milk as well, that is why you should always check the drug with your health care provider. Here at DrLact we try to analyze drugs based on available researches and in this sheet we will present our analysis for Natural Fit.

What is Natural Fit used for?


Supports metabolism.

Is Natural Fit usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Natural Fit safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Natural Fit. There is no credible study done on safety of Natural Fit while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Natural Fit as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Natural Fit Breastfeeding Analsys


Potassium phosphate, dibasic while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7447-40-7

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Sodium sulfate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7727-73-3

Osmotic laxatives are often used to cleanse the bowel before medical procedures.They base their action on the very little or nothing they are absorbed and by this means forcing the water to enter the intestine with the result of watery diarrhea. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. Another laxative with similar estructure which is Sodium Picosulfate (see specific info) is not excreted into breast milk Be aware of drinking enough fluids to avoid dehydration of the nursing mother who is already loosing water by producing about 1 liter of milk a day.

Chaste tree while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 91722-47-3

Ripe fruits are used. It contains heterosidic iridoid, estrogen-like flavonoids, terpenes and linoleic acid. Although traditionally used as a galactagogue, it contains diterpenes that have a dopamine-like effect which is inhibitory of prolactin release and milk production. Indications approved by the Commission E of the German Ministry of Health are: Irregularity of menses, pre-menstrual syndrome, mastodinia.

Fucus vesiculosus while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Seaweed. The stem of the plant is used.It contains large amounts of mucilage and minerals, including iodine which appears in variable amounts that can be significant, in such a way that it may be a cause a hyperthyroidism-like disease (anxiety, insomnia, tachycardia, palpitations).It may also contain heavy metals, being a species of seaweed with a high ability of contamination by toxic products. The commission E of the German Health Ministry has not approved any clinical indication, discouraging its use. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. However, there is information from other algae whose consumption is known to increase iodine levels in the plasma and breast milk.There have been reports of hypothyroidism in infants whose mothers have included in their diet important quantities of seaweed. There is no evidence of effectiveness on increasing milk production. The most effective method to increase milk production should be done by strengthening maternal self-confidence, evaluate and correct problems along with an effective support to breastfeeding mothers.

Lycopodium clavatum spore while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

Aerial summits and spores of this fern are used. Traditionally use as a diuretic and intestinal spasm relief drug. Also used for abrasions and skin irritation. It may be a cause of asthma and contact dermatitis.

Capsicum while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 84625-29-6

Capsaicin is an oleoresin contained in ripe and dry fruits of hot peppers. It is used for seasoning food and as medicine for topical analgesia in the form of creams, gels or patches. A low absorption into plasma (very low levels or undetectable in plasma) and rapid clearance make it highly unlikely the passage of significant amount toward breast milk. Do not apply on the chest or thoroughly clean it off before breastfeeding.

Milk thistle while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 65666-07-1

Milk thistle is a herb from which its fruits are used. It contains flavonolignans, silymarin and especially silibinin isomers, silychristin and silydianin, flavonoids, steroids and estrogen-like compounds. Attributed properties: Liver Protector.Indications based on the Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: cholelithiasis, liver disorders. Devoid of toxicity. It is excreted into breast milk in little or no amount.There is no evidence of its effectiveness as a galactogogue. Two studies have been performed (one with cows and the other with women) trying to show a galactogogue effect, but both are limited by a very flawed methodology.Best galactogogue is a frequent and on-demand breastfeeding together witn an appropriate technique. Precaution is recommended before taking herbal infusions:1. Ensure a reliable source: poisoning occurred by confusion with another plant that resulted to be toxic, poisoning from heavy metals and food poisoning by contamination with bacteria or fungi.2. Avoid excessive consumption. The "natural" products are not good in any amount: plants contain active substances from which come out much of our traditional pharmacopoeia and can cause poisoning if eaten in exaggerated quantity or prolonged time.

Gamboge while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 90045-23-1

The fruit of this tropical tree is used. It contains hydroxycitric lactones acid and anthocyanins.Unproven properties are: satiating, slimming. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. Scientific evidence has clearly shown a lack of effectiveness as lipid-lowering or slimming agent and a potential toxicity whenever abused. A low-calorie diet along with moderate exercise is preferable. Many women who breastfeed their infants regain the weight they had prior to pregnancy sooner than those who do not.

Centella asiatica while Breastfeeding

Safe

At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found. It contains triterpenic saponins (asiaticoside and madecassoside), tannins, phytosterols and essential oil. Frequent and exaggerated use of triterpenes may cause liver damage. Properties that are attributed for topical use (some clinically tested) like are healing of wound and venous tonic. There is no proof on effectiveness when used by mouth. Because of a low or nil systemic absorption through skin or vaginal mucosa, the topical use is believed be compatible with breastfeeding. Do not use it on the breast or clean it thoroughly to avoid ingestion by the infant. Avoid oral administration.

Potassium carbonate while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7447-40-7

Human milk has a potassium concentration of 13 meq/L, almost a half of rehydration solution content and a quarter of maximal IV recommended dose. Potassium supplementation does not alter milk concentration without increasing mother’s serum concentration, which is strictly limited from 3,5 to 5,5 meq/L.

Strychnos nux-vomica seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.

Rosa canina flower while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 84696-47-9

False fruits (red hips), petals ,and seeds are used It contains ascorbic acid, carotenes, oil, essential oil.. Unproved effects: laxative, diuretic. Indication after Commission E of German Ministry of Health: none. Maximal daily dose: 2 g

Salix alba bark while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 84082-82-6

Bark is used. It contains salicylic derivatives (2 – 11%) organic acids (salicylic) flavonoids and tannins. ESCOP and Commission E of German Ministry of Health do recommend it as anti-inflammatory and pain relief agent.

Activated charcoal while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7440-44-0

Powdered carbon with high adsorption levels.Administrated orally, it adsorbs drugs and toxins, avoiding their absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. It also has uses as an antidiarrheal and antiflatulent and for marking breast lesions in mammography. Since the last update we have not found published data about its excretion in breast milk. Its zero intestinal absorption (Torbet 2005, AEMPS 1998) prevents its passing into plasma and therefore into breast milk. It use is permitted in infants under one year old (Pediamecum 2015).

Oyster shell calcium carbonate, crude while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 471-34-1

Various calcium salts (Acetate, Carbonate, Chloride, Citrate, Phosphate, Gluceptate, Glucobionato, Lactate, Laxctobionato Pidolate, Silicate) are used in the management of hypocalcemia, supplements for treating calcium deficiency states and antacids ( Carbonate and Silicate) Daily requirement of calcium during lactation are 1 g (1.3 g in children under 20 years).Calcium supplements in the diet does not affect the concentration of calcium in milk.Excessive intake of calcium is not good for health. During lactation, consumption of calcium should not exceed 2.5 g a day. WHO List of Essential Medicines 2002 states that it is compatible with breastfeeding.

Sodium chloride while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 7647-14-5

Sodium chloride either as cooking salt, or, as oral rehydration solution, or, as IV fluid, is entirely compatible with BF.


Natural Fit Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Chaste tree while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 91722-47-3

Chasteberry (Vitex agnus-castus) is the fruit (berries) from the chaste tree. The berries contain essential oils (e.g., limonene, sabinene, 1,8-cineole [eucalyptol]), iridoid glycosides (e.g., agnoside, aucubin), diterpines (e.g., vitexilactone, rotundifuran), and flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, castican, orientin, isovitexin). Chasteberry is often used for irregularities of the menstrual cycle, infertility, premenstrual complaints, and cyclical breast pain.[1][2] Some constituents, possibly the diterpene clerodadienols, bind to dopamine D2 receptors in the pituitary.[3] In low doses, chasteberry increases serum prolactin and it is a purported galactogogue;[4][5][6] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use and galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[7] Some evidence indicates that high doses of chasteberry decrease serum prolactin and might decrease lactation.[8] It has been used to decrease breastmilk oversupply in Persian traditional medicine.[9] In general, chasteberry is well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events are nausea, headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, menstrual disorders, acne, pruritus, and erythematous rash; however, all are mild and reversible. Among 352 nursing mothers given chasteberry tincture, 15 cases of pruritus, exanthema, urticaria, and some cases of early menstrual period occurred. Because of concerning safety data and possible lactation suppression, chasteberry should be avoided during lactation.[10] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Capsicum while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84625-29-6

Cayenne peppers (Capsicum species) contain capsaicin and related compounds which cause the hot, spicy flavor, as well as numerous other components. Capsicum has no specific lactation-related uses and no information is available on the excretion of Capsicum components in breastmilk. Capsicum is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Oral ingestion can cause gastrointestinal irritation and has caused skin rashes in the breastfed infants of women who eat foods spiced with red peppers.[1] Capsicum may increase the risk of bleeding and should be used cautiously in patients taking anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications. Cross reactions can occur in those allergic to members of the Solanaceae family of plants (e.g., potatoes, tomatoes, paprika, Jimson weed). Capsaicin is used topically for pain. Application of Capsicum or capsaicin to the mother's skin should not affect the infant as long as the infant's skin does not come into direct contact with the areas of skin that have been treated. Do not apply capsaisin cream to the breast.Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Milk thistle while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 84604-20-6

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) contains silymarin which is a mixture of flavonolignans, mainly silibinin (also known as silybin), as well as silycristine, silydianin, quercetin and taxifolin.[1] Silymarin is a standardized preparation extracted from the fruits (seeds) of milk thistle. Milk thistle is a purported galactogogue,[2] and is included in some proprietary mixtures promoted to increase milk supply; however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use.[3][4][5] Although a study on the high potency purified milk thistle component, silymarin, and a phosphatidyl conjugate of silymarin indicated some galactagogue activity, this does not necessarily imply activity of milk thistle itself. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[6] Limited data indicate that the silymarin components are not excreted into breastmilk in measurable quantities. Additionally, because silymarin components are poorly absorbed orally, milk thistle is unlikely to adversely affect the breastfed infant. Milk thistle and silymarin are generally well tolerated in adults with only mild side effects such as diarrhea, headache, and skin reactions. It might increase the metabolism of some drugs. Rarely, severe allergies and anaphylaxis are reported. Avoid in patients with known allergy to members of the aster (Compositea or Asteraceae) family, such as daisies, artichokes, common thistle, and kiwi because cross-allergenicity is possible. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Gamboge while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 9000-25-3

Garcinia (Garcinia cambogia) fruit rind contains hydroxycitric acid. Garcinia has no specific lactation-related uses. It is most often used to promote weight loss. No data exist on the excretion of any components of Garcinia into breastmilk or on the safety and efficacy of Garcinia in nursing mothers or infants. Garcinia and hydroxycitric acid are generally well tolerated in adults, with occasional gastrointestinal discomfort reported.[1] Because there is no published experience with Garcinia or hydroxycitric acid during breastfeeding, these products should be avoided, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Green tea leaf while Breastfeeding



Green tea (Camellia sinensis) contains caffeine, polyphenols (e.g., quercetin), and tannins. Fussiness, jitteriness and poor sleep patterns have been reported in the infants of mothers with very high caffeine intakes (see the LactMed record on caffeine for details). Giving tea directly to infants can interfere with iron absorption and cause anemia,[1] but anemia in breastfed infants has not been reported with maternal tea ingestion. Application of wet tea bags to the nipples has been studied as a method of reducing nipple pain during the first few days of nursing. Two small, moderately well-controlled studies found a positive effect of the tea bags, but warm water compresses were as at least as effective as tea bags.[2][3] No studies were found that examined the use of oral green tea extract, topical application of green tea extract to the nipples, or to the topical product Veregren applied to genital warts during breastfeeding. Topical products applied away from the breast should pose negligible risk for the breastfed infant. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Sodium phosphate, dibasic, heptahydrate while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 7558-79-4; 7558-80-7

Phosphate is a normal constituent of breastmilk. Phosphate concentrations have not been measured in breastmilk after large maternal doses of sodium phosphate, such a 30 gram oral dose for pre-procedural bowel evacuation. However, the added phosphate in breastmilk is likely to be only about 130 mg over 24 hours in this situation. The increase from a typical dose of a rectal enema would be considerably less than this amount. Breastmilk sodium concentration is tightly regulated, and will not be affected. It is probably not necessary to suspend breastfeeding after the use of oral sodium phosphate solutions given once or twice for bowel evacuation before a procedure, but if there is concern, suspension of nursing for 24 hours after a dose should result in negligible increase in phosphate ingestion by the infant. Use of a phosphate rectal enema by a nursing mother would require no special precautions.

Thyroid, bovine while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8028-36-2

Thyroid is an animal-derived mixture of levothyroxine (T4) and liothyronine (T3), which are normal components of human milk. Limited data on exogenous replacement doses of levothyroxine during breastfeeding indicate no adverse effects in infants. If thyroid is required by the mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding. The American Thyroid Association recommends that subclinical and overt hypothyroidism should be treated with levothyroxine in lactating women seeking to breastfeed.[1] Thyroid dosage requirement may be increased in the postpartum period compared to prepregnancy requirements patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.[2]


Natural Fit Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Thuja occidentalis leafy twig and Breastfeeding

Low Risk

Thuja is one of the most common remedies used for warts. Topical Usage of Thuja for wart is likely safe while breastfeeding. We do not have sufficient safety usage data for Thuja oral consumption, However its likely unsafe to use thuja orally while breastfeeding.

Warning: Tropical usage in breast area shall be avoided to prevent the Thuja passing orally in Infants.

Sodium phosphate, dibasic, heptahydrate and Breastfeeding

Safe


Pork liver and Breastfeeding

Safe

If consumed moderately liver and various organ meats are compatible in breast feeding.


Thyroid, bovine and Breastfeeding

Safe


Water and Breastfeeding

Safe

Water is essential for life. It is considered safe to breast feed while using supplemental water.



I already used Natural Fit and meanwhile I breastfed my baby should I be concerned?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Natural Fit is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Natural Fit, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Natural Fit has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Natural Fit, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Natural Fit in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week