Glaucoma Breastfeeding
Most health expert recommend six month of exclusive breastfeeding but statics suggest that numbers are not good, almost 95% mothers start breastfeeding but this number drops to 40% in first three month and further it drops to 15% till fifth month. Sometime its due to need of medication usage. Because of these statics its important to provide good information on safety of drugs in breastfeeding so that it can be improved when possible. In this FAQ sheet we will discuss about exposure to Glaucoma while breastfeeding. We will also discuss about common side effects and warnings associated with Glaucoma.

What is Glaucoma used for?


SECTION Glaucoma Formulated for associated symptoms such as increased intraocular pressure, swelling of eyes, atrophy of optic nerve and narrow field of vision.

Is Glaucoma usage safe while breastfeeding? If a lactating mother is using it can there be any effect on growth or development of infant?

Glaucoma safe while breastfeeding
FDA does not regulate Glaucoma. There is no credible study done on safety of Glaucoma while breastfeeding, Same holds truth for almost all homeopathic medicines however homeopathic medicines go through a process called potentisation. In potentisation homeopathic preparation goes through repeated dilution and shaking. Homeopaths state that repeated dilution and shaking helps the body to heal naturally. Due to extreme dilution of active ingredients homeopathic medicines are mostly safe in breastfeeding, Hence we can consider Glaucoma as safe to use while breastfeeding.. Below we have provided analysis of its active ingredients. Safety rating of ingredients holds truth for herbal product but may not apply for homeopathic diluted drugs.

Glaucoma Breastfeeding Analsys


Aconitum napellus while Breastfeeding

Safe

The flowers and roots and leaves of this herbaceous plant are used. It contains sesquiterpene lactones, essential oil, flavonoids and traces of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Topical use on whole skin. Indications in traditional medicine without evidence of its effectiveness: topical anti-inflammatory in bruises, sprains and localized muscle pain (EMA 2014). Do not apply to damaged skin It is very toxic orally (Anderson 2017), having described gastroenteritis, cardiac arrhythmia, neurological problems and death (WHO 2007 p.77, nal 2001) in people who took it and a case of severe hemolytic anemia in 9-day-old newborn whose mother was taking arnica infusion (Miller 2009). At the date of the last update, we did not find published data on its excretion in breast milk. The small dose and poor plasma absorption of most topical dermatological preparations make it unlikely that a significant amount will pass into breast milk. Do not apply on the breast so that the infant does not ingest it, or in large areas or for prolonged periods to avoid systemic absorption. Hands should be washed after applying arnica to avoid possible contact with the infants mouth.

Gold while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 7440-57-5

One case of facial edema that was barely related to this drug has been described. It has an extremely long half-life span.

Atropa belladonna while Breastfeeding

Unsafe

CAS Number: 8007-93-0

In herbal medicine the leaves of this plant that contains numerous alkaloids are used: l-hyoscyamine and atropine, scopolamine or hyoscine and, all of them potentially high toxic.Traditionally used with poor clinical evidence based on trials as anti-asthmatic, for common colds and intestinal spasms. At latest update no published data on excretion into breast milk were found. With anticholinergic and antimuscarinic properties that may reduce milk production: if necessary take as low dose as possible and avoid long-term treatment if decreasing milk production is observed.Serious side effects (tachycardia, thirst, fever, mydriasis, seizures, coma), especially in infants and newborns (Caksen 2003 Laffargue 2011, Glatstein 2014, Rodríguez-González 2014).There have been cases of gangrene when applied to the chest (Wani 2011). Belladonna may be included in association with other “over the counter" medications of doubtful effectiveness or safety. Overall drug associations are not recommended. Cautions when taking herbal teas:1. Make sure it is obtained from a reliable source: reportedly, poisonings have occurred due to confusion after using another plant with toxic effects (Hsu 1995), some others contain heavy metals that may cause poisoning and others may cause food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi.2. Do not take it excessively. "Natural" products are not always good in any amount: plants contain active substances from which are made many compounds of our traditional pharmacopoeia that can cause poisoning if consumed in exaggerated quantities or for long periods.

Cinchona officinalis bark while Breastfeeding

Safe

Cinchona alkaloid used in the prophylaxis and treatment of malaria (Pérez 2009). Administered orally or intravenously. It is excreted in breast milk in clinically insignificant amounts (Mathew 2004, Phillips 1986, Terwilliger 1934), much lower than the dose used in newborns and infants (Fulton 1992).No problems have been observed in infants whose mothers were taking it (FDA 2008, Terwilliger 1934). Its use is authorized in infants and children.Avoid in cases of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (Mathew 2004, WHO/UNICEF 2002, Fulton 1992). American Academy of Pediatrics: medication usually compatible with breastfeeding (AAP 2001). WHO list of essential medicines: compatible with breastfeeding (WHO / UNICEF, 2002).

Colchicum autumnale bulb while Breastfeeding

Low Risk

CAS Number: 64-86-8

It is used for treatment of Gout, Familial Mediterranean Fever. As well as for other conditions like Amyloidosis, Behçet's Syndrome, Pericarditis, Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Pyoderma gangrenosum. It is excreted in breast milk in quantities that differ according to different published studies, from no clinically significant in some, until being important in others, but there have been no problems in infants whose mothers were treated, even after months, with undetectable plasma levels in these infants. The concomitant use of macrolide antibiotics and fruit juices (both the mother and the infant) , especially grape-fruit, is not recommended since they may interfere with bile excretion and greatly increase toxicity. The American Academy of Breastfeeding rates it as compatible with breastfeeding. List of Essential Medicines of WHO (2002): compatible with breastfeeding

Euphrasia stricta while Breastfeeding

Safe

CAS Number: 790302-50-0

Aerial summits are used. It contains galic tannins, phenol-carboxylic acids, flavonoids and iridoid heterosides. The Commission E of German Ministry of Health does not support the traditional use as anti-diarrhea and eye anti-inflammatory agent.

Strychnos nux-vomica seed while Breastfeeding

Dangerous

CAS Number: 8046-97-7

Dried seed of this plant has been used. It contains brucine and strychnine. It is highly toxic and easily lethal.


Glaucoma Breastfeeding Analsys - 2


Atropa belladonna while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 8007-93-0

Belladonna (Atropa belladonna) contains anticholinergic alkaloids such as atropine and scopolamine. Belladonna has been used in the past for headache, airway obstruction, and irritable bowel syndrome among others, but its use has been supplanted by more specific and less toxic compounds. Long-term use of belladonna might reduce milk production by reducing serum prolactin.[1] Application of belladonna paste to the nipple to reduce milk secretion during lactation is an extremely old use.[2] However, it is still used this way in rural India for treating breast abscesses and may have contributed to cases of breast gangrene.[3] Because of the narrow therapeutic index and variable potency of plant-based (i.e., nonstandardized) belladonna, it should be avoided orally and topically during lactation. Homeopathic products are not likely to interfere with breastfeeding or cause toxicity. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Cinchona officinalis bark while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 130-95-0

Because of the low levels of quinine in breastmilk, amounts ingested by the infant are small and would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants. The dosage in milk is far below those required to treat an infant for malaria.[1] However, quinine should not be used in mothers with an infant who is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient.[2] Even the relatively small amounts of quinine in tonic water ingested by the mother have caused hemolysis in G6PD-deficient infants.

Colchicum autumnale bulb while Breastfeeding

CAS Number: 64-86-8

Long-term prophylactic maternal doses of colchicine up to 1.5 mg daily produce levels in milk that result in the infant receiving less than 10% of the maternal weight-adjusted dosage. The highest milk levels occur 2 to 4 hours after a dose, so avoiding breastfeeding during this time can minimize the infant dose, although some clinicians simply recommend taking the drug after nursing. No adverse effects in breastfed infants have been reported in case series and a case-control study and some authors consider colchicine safe during breastfeeding in women being treated for familial Mediterranean fever or rheumatic conditions.[1][2][3][4]


Glaucoma Breastfeeding Analsys - 3


Gelsemium sempervirens root and Breastfeeding

Unsafe

All parts of the false jasmine usually contain toxic alkaloids. Eating just one flower has reportedly been lethal to children. The plant can also cause skin allergies in some people and it is possible that the plant toxins can be absorbed through the skin, especially if there are cuts. Its not recommended to use false jasmine while breastfeeding. It is acceptable in homeopathic preparation.


Phosphorus and Breastfeeding

Safe

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body, making up about 1% of total body weight. Calcium, which gives strength to bones and teeth, needs to be combined with another mineral, such as phosphorous, to become stabilized before it can be effective.

Phosphorus also helps to release energy from food as it plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Phosphorus is naturally found in many food sources and phosphorus supplementation while breastfeeding is mostly safe.

You can easily get all the phosphorus you need from a well-balanced diet (even though most prenatal vitamins dont contain phosphorus). For example, 2 cup of yogurt provides nearly all your phosphorus for the day.

Warning: Consuming high doses of phosphorus for a short time can cause diarrhea or stomach pain. The long term over-consumption of foods high in phosphorus can deplete calcium resources and lead to reduced bone mass, which means that bones are more likely to fracture.

Toxicodendron pubescens leaf and Breastfeeding

Safe

Poison ivy rash is caused by contact with poison ivy, a plant that grows almost everywhere in the United States. The sap of the poison ivy plant, also known as Toxicodendron radicans, contains oil called urushiol. This is the irritant that causes an allergic reaction and rash.

You dont even have to come in direct contact with the plant to have a reaction. The oil can linger on your gardening equipment, golf clubs, or even your shoes. Brushing against the plant or anything thats touched it can result in skin irritation, pain, and itching.

Poison ivy is not contagious. It cannot spread from person to person. It can, however, be spread in a few other scenarios. For example, a pet that encounters poison ivy leaves can carry the urushiol oil in its fur. When you touch the animal, you may pick up the oil and develop a rash. Clothing fibers can also spread poison ivys oil. If you touch poison ivy with a pair of pants or shirt and do not wash it after contact is made, you could develop another rash if you touch the clothing. You can also spread the oil to another person, if they come into contact with clothes that have touched poison ivy. A poison ivy rash cannot spread across your body either. If you come into contact with poison ivy that is burning, you may inhale plant compounds. This can lead to irritation in the lungs, airways, and eyes.

Poison ivy rash doesnt pose a serious risk to a pregnant woman or a developing baby. Your baby can get the rash only from touching something with the oil on it. And the liquid in the blisters doesnt contain urushiol, so the rash cant be spread by scratching or popping them. If you notice a new patch of rash on your baby a few days after the first one appears, its not because the rash has spread. If you have poison ivy it should not affect the milk and health of breastfed baby.

Homeopathic preparations of Poison ivy are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual period problems, swelling, and itchy skin disorders. Due to extreme dilution of poison ivy in homeopathic medicines its mostly safe in breastfeeding.



What should I do if already breastfed my kid after using Glaucoma?

Due to high dilution of ingredients in homeopathic medicines they do not create much problem for baby. Glaucoma is a homeopathic medicine and if your baby does not have any abnormal symptoms then there is nothing to worry about. Be careful with too much usage of ethanol based homeopathic medicines during breastfeeding.


I am nursing mother and my doctor has suggested me to use Glaucoma, is it safe?

Homeopathic medicines are usually safe in breastfeeding and if Glaucoma has been recommended by doctor then there should be no concern about its usage in breastfeeding.


If I am using Glaucoma, will my baby need extra monitoring?

Not exactly.


Who can I talk to if I have questions about usage of Glaucoma in breastfeeding?

US
National Womens Health and Breastfeeding Helpline: 800-994-9662 (TDD 888-220-5446) 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday

UK
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 0300-100-0212 9.30am to 9.30pm, daily
Association of Breastfeeding Mothers: 0300-330-5453
La Leche League: 0345-120-2918
The Breastfeeding Network supporter line in Bengali and Sylheti: 0300-456-2421
National Childbirth Trust (NCT): 0300-330-0700

Australia
National Breastfeeding Helpline: 1800-686-268 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Canada
Telehealth Ontario for breastfeeding: 1-866-797-0000 24 hours a day, 7 days a week